Apple’s Rumored 6.1-Inch iPhone Said to Be 18:9 With 2,160×1,080 Resolution and Ultra-Slim Bezels

While the rumored 6.1-inch iPhone isn't expected to feature an OLED display like the iPhone X, the device will still have a more advanced LCD display than previous iPhones, according to Taiwan's Commercial Times.

Japan Display's Full Active LCD

The report, translated from Chinese, claims Apple will be adopting Japan Display's so-called "Full Active" LCD technology. Unlike traditional LCDs, like those of the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus, Full Active LCDs only require ultra-slim 0.5mm bezels on all four sides, even smaller than those on the iPhone X.

Japan Display says its Full Active LCDs are six-inch displays with a resolution of 2,160×1,080 pixels. Accordingly, the panels have an 18:9 aspect ratio, meaning their length is double their width.

This suggests the 6.1-inch iPhone will have a taller display, likely with a cutout for the TrueDepth camera system, although not quite as tall as the iPhone X with its unique 19.5:9 aspect ratio. The device is already rumored to resemble the iPhone X's nearly full-screen design, so this would make sense.

A 6.1-inch display with a resolution of 2,160×1,080 pixels would have around 395 pixels per inch. KGI Securities Ming-Chi Kuo said the 6.1-inch iPhone's display will have 320-330 PPI, however, so there's conflicting information.

This rumor is consistent with a report from The Wall Street Journal in September, which said Apple was considering using Japan Display's advanced LCD panels in some 2018 iPhone models. Full Active LCDs have already been used by some Chinese smartphone makers, including Xiaomi for its Mi Mix 2.

The use of Full Active LCDs instead of OLED displays is one design compromise that will allow Apple to sell the 6.1-inch iPhone at a cheaper price point. Others include an aluminum frame instead of stainless steel, a single-lens instead of dual-lens rear camera, and no 3D Touch, according to Kuo.

In a research note obtained by MacRumors today, Kuo predicted the 6.1-inch iPhone will be a mid-range device priced between $700 and $800 in the United States, up from his previous $650 to $750 estimate.

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KGI: 6.1-Inch iPhone to Have Single-Lens Rear Camera, Aluminum Frame, 3GB RAM, and No 3D Touch, Cost $700-$800

KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo today shared additional details about the rumored 6.1-inch iPhone that he expects to launch in the second half of 2018.

Note: KGI's image has a slight error. iPhone 8 Plus has 3GB of RAM.

We already know the device is said to have some iPhone X features, including Face ID, but with some design compromises to achieve a cheaper price point. That will include an LCD screen, as known, and now Kuo says the device will have an aluminum frame, single-lens rear camera, and no 3D Touch.

It's unclear if the back of the iPhone will also be forged from aluminum rather than glass, a tradeoff that would inhibit wireless charging.

In a research note obtained by MacRumors on Tuesday, Kuo added that the 6.1-inch iPhone also won't adopt the iPhone X's stacked logic board and L-shaped battery pack. Instead, he said the device will have a standard non-stacked logic board and rectangular battery pack like the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus.

Kuo believes the 6.1-inch iPhone will be a mid-range device priced between $700 and $800 in the United States, up from his previous $650 to $750 estimate. The device is expected to be announced around September-October as usual alongside a new 5.8-inch iPhone X and a larger 6.5-inch version dubbed iPhone X Plus.

The research note reads in part:
Development schedule of new 6.1" LCD iPhone slightly behind 6.5" and 5.8" OLED models, but it may enjoy extended longevity into 1H19F, boosting slow season outlook: We predict the 6.1" LCD iPhone will differ from the 6.5" and 5.8" OLED models in terms of certain specs, for reasons of cost/price and product segmentation. However, this shouldn’t have any effect on key user experience. We revise up our price projection for the 6.1" model from $650-$750 to $700-$800, and remain positive on shipments momentum.
KGI Securities expects the 6.1-inch iPhone to account for around 50 percent of the new iPhone lineup's shipments, with sales remaining strong into 2019.

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HomePod Works Abroad in English Only, Other Languages Coming in Future Software Updates

While the HomePod is initially launching in the United States, Australia, and the United Kingdom next month, MacRumors can confirm that Apple's smart speaker will function in most other countries around the world.


When users try to set up the HomePod outside of the those aforementioned countries, a dialogue box will appear that directs them to choose one of three English language options to proceed. We can confirm this setup process can be completed, and that the HomePod functions, in mostly any country from day one.

The setup process was leaked by Guilherme Rambo‏ back in August:

What this all means is that if you manage to purchase a HomePod from one of the initial launch countries, you could take it back home to a country like Canada or elsewhere in Europe and it should function properly, but until Siri gains support for additional languages, you'll be stuck using English only.

While this information isn't all that surprising, we decided to share it given an influx of questions we have received from our international readers.

Apple today announced the HomePod will be available to order this Friday, January 26 in the United States, Australia, and the United Kingdom for $349, $499, and £319 respectively. Those orders will begin arriving to customers, alongside limited in-store availability, starting Friday, February 9.

Apple said the HomePod will launch in France and Germany this spring, marking the first countries where English isn't the primary language spoken where the speaker will be available. As mentioned, a future software update should add French and German language support to Siri on the HomePod.

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Apple Details HomePod’s Gesture Controls for Siri and Music Playback

Apple today updated its HomePod product page with new details about the speaker's gesture controls for Siri and audio playback.


Apple has confirmed that users can tap the top of the HomePod to play, pause, skip a song, or adjust the volume, or touch and hold to talk to Siri. A colorful, animated LED waveform will appear when Siri is listening.

A single tap plays or pauses music, a double tap skips to the next track, and a triple trap returns to the previous track. Tapping and holding the digital plus or minus sign raises or lowers the speaker's volume respectively.


The touch and hold gesture to invoke Siri is in addition to the "Hey Siri" voice command that can be said from anywhere in a room.

Apple today announced that the HomePod will be available to order starting Friday, January 26, with in-store availability and orders arriving to customers starting Friday, February 9, in the United States, Australia, and the United Kingdom.

Apple also revealed some other HomePod information today: the speaker will launch in France and Germany this spring, while multi-room audio and stereo sound support for multiple HomePods will be included in a software update later this year.

HomePod comes in White or Space Gray and is priced at $349 in the United States, £319 in the United Kingdom, and $499 in Australia.

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HomePod Costs £319 in UK and $499 in Australia, Launches in France and Germany in Spring 2018

In addition to the HomePod launching February 9 in the United States, Australia, and the United Kingdom, Apple has also revealed that its Siri-enabled speaker will launch in France and Germany at some point "this spring," suggesting a release date between March and June at the absolute latest in those countries.


France and Germany will be the first HomePod launch countries where English isn't the primary language spoken. Siri on the HomePod should be able to answer French and German queries as on the iPhone and other devices.

While we already knew the HomePod is priced at $349 in the United States, Apple today confirmed the speaker will cost £319 in the United Kingdom and $499 in Australia. Apple hasn't revealed pricing information in France or Germany yet, or provided release dates for other countries like Canada at this time.

Apple has primarily positioned the HomePod as a speaker that can stream Apple Music, but with built-in Siri, users can send messages, set timers, play podcasts, check the news and weather, control HomeKit-enabled smart home accessories, and complete other tasks without needing to take out their iPhone.

The high-fidelity speaker is equipped with spatial awareness and Apple-engineered audio technology, including a seven‑tweeter array and high-excursion woofer. The nearly seven inch tall speaker is powered by Apple's A8 chip.

HomePod is Apple's answer to the Amazon Echo and Google Home. The speaker was originally set to be released in December, but Apple delayed the launch, and missed out on sales during the holiday shopping season in the process.

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HomePod Launches February 9, Available to Order Starting Friday in United States, UK, and Australia

Apple today announced its HomePod speaker will be released on Friday, February 9, with pre-orders beginning this Friday, January 26 via Apple's online store in the United States, Australia, and the United Kingdom. Apple added that HomePod will launch in France and Germany at some point "this spring."


HomePod is priced at $349 in the United States. On February 9, the speaker will be available in Apple Stores and at select resellers, including Best Buy in the United States; Argos, Dixons Carphone, John Lewis, Shop Direct, and EE in the UK; and The Good Guys, Harvey Norman, JB Hi-Fi, Myer, and Telstra in Australia.

Apple's marketing chief Phil Schiller:
HomePod is a magical new music experience from Apple. It brings advanced audio technologies like beam-forming tweeters, a high-excursion woofer and automatic spatial awareness, together with the entire Apple Music catalog and the latest Siri intelligence, in a simple, beautiful design that is so much fun to use. We're so excited for people to get HomePod into their homes, apartments and businesses to hear it for themselves. We think they will be blown away by the audio quality. The team has worked to give Siri a deeper knowledge of music so that you can ask to play virtually anything from your personal favorites to the latest chart-topping releases, simply by saying 'Hey Siri.'
HomePod is a high-fidelity speaker equipped with spatial awareness and Apple-engineered audio technology, including a seven‑tweeter array and high-excursion woofer. Powered by Apple's custom A8 chip, the HomePod also serves as a "Hey Siri" assistant and a hub for HomeKit accessories.

More details to follow…

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Tim Cook Makes First Trip to Canada as Apple CEO With Surprise Visit to Toronto

Tim Cook made his first appearance in Canada today as the head of Apple with an unannounced visit to Toronto today.


Just before noon local time, Cook made a surprise visit to the company's retail store at the Eaton Centre shopping mall, reports The Globe and Mail. Cook was pictured alongside young students attending an Apple Field Trip, an in-store initiative that introduces kids to coding, podcasting, and other creative skills.


Cook's stop in Toronto follows a trip to Harlow College near London, England on Friday, in line with Apple's announcement that its Everyone Can Code initiative has recently expanded to 70 colleges and universities across Europe. Last week, Cook also visited Reno, where Apple broke ground on a new data center.

Cook has served as Apple's CEO since August 24, 2011, after the late Steve Jobs resigned from the position for a final time.

Via: iPhone in Canada


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KGI: Apple to Discontinue iPhone X Rather Than Sell at Lower Price When Second-Generation Model Launches

Apple will discontinue the first-generation iPhone X when the second-generation model launches later this year, rather than bump the device down its smartphone lineup for lower than $999, according to KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, who clarified his earlier prediction with a follow-up research note today.


Kuo said that Apple keeping the current iPhone X in its smartphone lineup for a reduced price, such as $899, would likely cannibalize sales of the mid-range 6.1-inch iPhone with Face ID and a LCD display that he expects to launch in the second half of 2018 for between $650 and $750 in the United States.

An excerpt from Kuo's research note obtained by MacRumors on Monday:
iPhone X would hurt product brand value & lineup of 2H18 new models if it continues to sell at a lower price after 2H18 new models launch: Lowering iPhone X's price after the 2H18 new models launch would be a negative to product brand value given 3D sensing and OLED display are features of the new high-price model. Additionally, to sell iPhone X at a lower price may have a negative impact on shipments of the new 6.1" LCD iPhone in 2H18. Thus, we estimate iPhone X will reach end-of-life (EOL) around the middle of 2018.
If accurate, Apple's smartphone lineup later in 2018 would consist of the second-generation 5.8-inch iPhone X, which will likely remain $999, a larger 6.5-inch version dubbed iPhone X Plus, and the mid-range 6.1-inch iPhone. Below that would likely be iPhone 8, iPhone 7, and iPhone SE models.

Here's how Apple's new iPhone lineup could look:

• iPhone SE: $349
• iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus: $449 and $569
• iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus: $549 and $669
• 6.1-inch iPhone with Face ID: $649 or $749
• 5.8-inch second-generation iPhone X: $999
• 6.5-inch second-generation iPhone X Plus: $1,099

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Apple Store in Nashville Closing in Early February During Renovations

Apple recently announced that its Green Hills retail store in Nashville, Tennessee will be temporarily closed for renovations beginning February 11.

Apple Store at The Mall at Green Hills in 2008

Apple Green Hills will likely remain closed until late 2018, so customers will have to venture a bit further south to Apple's nearby store at the CoolSprings Galleria shopping mall in Franklin, Tennessee until further notice.


For the past few years, Apple has been renovating dozens of its older stores with newer designs. In addition, many of the locations have expanded by adding a floor or taking over adjacent storefronts, while some have relocated entirely.

Last week, Apple announced that its first store in South Korea opens on January 27, just a few weeks prior to the 2018 Winter Olympics in the country. By our count, the location should be Apple's 500th store around the world.

Via: 9to5Mac

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iPhone X Accounted for 1 in 5 Smartphones Sold by Apple in United States Last Quarter According to Survey

Every one in five smartphones sold by Apple in the United States in the fourth quarter of 2017 was an iPhone X, according to data shared with MacRumors by research firm Consumer Intelligence Research Partners.


Below is the exact model-by-model breakdown of Apple's total iPhone sales between October and December, based on the firm's survey of 500 consumers who purchased an iPhone in the United States during that period.

  • iPhone 8: 24 percent
  • iPhone 8 Plus: 17 percent
  • iPhone X: 20 percent
  • All other iPhone models: 39 percent

Consumer Intelligence Research Partners co-founder Josh Lowitz says the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X's combined 61 percent share of Apple's total smartphone sales is 11 percent lower than the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus accounted for in the year-ago quarter, but there are several caveats to consider:
At 61%, the three newest iPhone models together represented a somewhat smaller share of total US iPhone sales in the quarter, compared to 72% for the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus a year ago. Yet, comparisons to earlier launches are tricky at best. First, iPhone X wasn’t available for the full quarter. The Apple model pie is further divided, as they now offer eight models, the most ever. And, Apple launched the new phones on a different schedule, announcing three new models at once, but delaying the lauch of the most advanced and expensive one, iPhone X, for five weeks following the launch of iPhone 8 and 8 Plus.
Apple doesn't disclose iPhone sales on a model-by-model basis, so this survey only serves as a rough estimate. However, analysts and investors will be listening for any clues about the sales mix during Apple's next quarterly earnings call on February 1.

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