Macs Effectively Now Have a Three-Year Warranty in Australia and New Zealand Under Consumer Law

If you bought and own a Mac in Australia or New Zealand, your computer effectively now has warranty coverage for up to three years from its original date of purchase, even without purchasing optional AppleCare+ coverage.


Apple will now offer warranty coverage on most Mac parts for up to 24 months after its limited one-year warranty period, under consumer law in each country, according to an internal document distributed to Apple Stores and Apple Authorized Service Providers and later obtained by MacRumors.

Apple is complying with Australia and New Zealand laws that give consumers the right to ask for a repair or replacement free of charge if a product experiences failure within a "reasonable" amount of time after purchase.

Mac owners can inquire about service under Australian and New Zealand consumer law at an Apple Store or Apple Authorized Service Provider, but we can't guarantee that every employee will be knowledgable about this policy. The 36-month coverage period for Macs is effective from today—that's December 13, 2017.

Eligible parts include the display, battery, SSD or hard drive, RAM, logic boards, GPU, internal cables, power supply, and other electronic components, so virtually every aspect of a Mac is covered, according to the document.

Apple provides a summary of consumer law, its limited one-year warranty, and its optional AppleCare+ coverage on its website in Australia and New Zealand.


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Macs Effectively Now Have a Three-Year Warranty in Australia and New Zealand Under Consumer Law

If you bought and own a Mac in Australia or New Zealand, your computer effectively now has warranty coverage for up to three years from its original date of purchase, even without purchasing optional AppleCare+ coverage.


Apple will now offer warranty coverage on most Mac parts for up to 24 months after its limited one-year warranty period, under consumer law in each country, according to an internal document distributed to Apple Stores and Apple Authorized Service Providers and later obtained by MacRumors.

Apple is complying with Australia and New Zealand laws that give consumers the right to ask for a repair or replacement free of charge if a product experiences failure within a "reasonable" amount of time after purchase.

Mac owners can inquire about service under Australian and New Zealand consumer law at an Apple Store or Apple Authorized Service Provider, but we can't guarantee that every employee will be knowledgable about this policy. The 36-month coverage period for Macs is effective from today—that's December 13, 2017.

Eligible parts include the display, battery, SSD or hard drive, RAM, logic boards, GPU, internal cables, power supply, and other electronic components, so virtually every aspect of a Mac is covered, according to the document.

Apple provides a summary of consumer law, its limited one-year warranty, and its optional AppleCare+ coverage on its website in Australia and New Zealand.


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Apple Increases Mac Trade-In Values to Up to $2,500

Apple today increased its trade-in values for select Mac models released in 2009 and later. In partnership with buyback company Phobio, Apple now offers customers up to $2,500, compared to up to $1,500 previously.


The new trade-in values in the United States are as follows:

• MacBook: up to $1,110
• MacBook Air: up to $430
• MacBook Pro: up to $2,500
• iMac: up to $2,500
• Mac Pro: up to $1,560

To determine how much credit you can receive, visit the Phobio website, enter your Mac's serial number, and answer a few questions about its current condition. Phobio will then provide an estimate based on the information provided.

If you accept the quote, you'll receive payment after your Mac has been inspected and its condition has been verified. The payment can be in the form of an emailed Apple Store gift card, PayPal deposit, or a virtual prepaid Visa card.

A maxed-out 2017 15-inch MacBook Pro with Touch Bar in good condition, for example, has a trade-in value of $2,510. A maxed-out 2016 15-inch MacBook Pro with Touch Bar in good condition is eligible for $1,460 credit.


Apple's trade-up program is convenient, but customers can get better resale value by selling their Mac on eBay or listing it in classifieds such as Craigslist or the MacRumors Marketplace, so long as you adhere to our rules and requirements.

Apple also offers up to $500 for select PCs. Meanwhile, Macs released earlier than 2009 are eligible for Apple's free Renew and Recycling program only.


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Intel’s Cannonlake Chips Allegedly Delayed Until End of 2018

Intel will not release its next-generation Cannonlake processors until the end of 2018, according to supply chain sources that spoke to DigiTimes.

Unsurprisingly, Intel is believed to be facing problems with its 10-nanometer process, leading to a series of delays. Cannonlake chips were initially set to debut as early as 2017, but have been pushed back several times.
However, Intel has reportedly been facing difficulties with its 10nm process. The Cannon Lake processors, originally set for launch in 2017, have seen their launch schedule revised three times: first to the end of 2017 or early 2018, then to the mid-2018, and now the end of 2018, the sources noted.
If Intel doesn't get Cannonlake out until later in 2018, it could be followed shortly by Intel's Ice Lake chips, made on Intel's 10nm+ process. There's already been some confusion about Cannonlake, as Intel has been referring to Ice Lake as the successor to Coffee Lake, making it unclear just how Cannonlake fits in.

According to DigiTimes, some manufacturers are already planning to skip out on the Cannonlake generation to wait for Ice Lake chips, and others are revising their notebook plans following Intel's delays.

As for Apple, Cannonlake delays have the potential to impact upgrade plans for the low-power MacBook models but are unlikely to cause problems for other notebook upgrades.

Cannonlake is a low voltage chipset not appropriate for machines like the MacBook Pro, with the next-generation of those machines like to adopt Intel's as of yet to be released 14nm++ Coffee Lake chips or the eighth-generation Intel chips announced in August, which are part of a Kaby Lake Refresh.

Related Roundup: MacBook
Tags: Intel, Coffee Lake, Cannonlake, Ice Lake
Buyer's Guide: MacBook (Buy Now)

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Apple Now Selling Refurbished 2017 MacBooks With Kaby Lake Processors

Apple has added its latest 12-inch MacBook, originally released in June 2017, to its refurbished store for the first time. All models feature Intel's seventh-generation Kaby Lake processors and faster graphics options.


A refurbished base model with a 1.2GHz dual-core Intel Core m3 processor, 256GB flash storage, 8GB of RAM, and Intel HD Graphics 615 is available for $1,099 in the United States, reflecting savings of $200 off Apple's regular price of $1,299. Available colors include Gold, Rose Gold, Silver, and Space Gray.

The base model with a faster 1.3GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 processor, 256GB flash storage, 8GB of RAM, and Intel HD Graphics 615 is available for $1,189 in the United States, reflecting savings of $210 off Apple's regular price of $1,399. Available colors include Gold, Rose Gold, and Space Gray.

The base model is also available with an upgraded 16GB of RAM for $1,269, or $230 off Apple's regular price of $1,499.

A refurbished higher-end model with a 1.3GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 processor, 512GB flash storage, 8GB of RAM, and Intel HD Graphics 615 is available for $1,359 in the United States, reflecting savings of $240 off Apple's regular price of $1,599. Available colors include Gold, Rose Gold, Silver, and Space Gray.

The higher-end model is also available with an upgraded 16GB of RAM for $1,529, or $270 off Apple's regular price of $1,799.

Other built-to-order configurations are available for between $1,099 and $1,659 in the United States, including models with up to a 1.4GHz dual-core Intel Core i7 processor, 512GB flash storage, 16GB of RAM, and Intel HD Graphics 615.

Apple says refurbished MacBook models are thoroughly inspected, tested, cleaned, and repackaged, including the manuals and cables included in the box. The notebooks are each given a new serial number and undergo a final quality assurance inspection prior to being added to Apple's refurbished store.

A refurbished MacBook comes with Apple's standard one-year warranty effective on the date the notebook is delivered. The warranty can be extended to three years from the original purchase date with AppleCare+ for Mac, which costs $249 for the the 12-inch MacBook in the United States.

Apple has also added refurbished 2017 MacBooks to its Canadian store, with prices ranging between $1,459 and $2,069.

Related: Guide to Buying Refurbished Apple Products

Related Roundup: MacBook
Tag: refurbished
Buyer's Guide: MacBook (Buy Now)

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Apple’s Q2 2017 MacBook Sales Increase 17 Percent Over the Previous Quarter

Apple's notebook shipments totaled an estimated 3.98 million units in the second quarter of the 2017 calendar year, representing a quarter-on-quarter increase of 17.1 percent, according to new data published by market research firm TrendForce.

Apple gained ground on ASUS at fifth place in the second quarter ranking, with a 0.7 percent increase over the previous quarter to leave both companies taking a 10 percent share of the market. TrendForce highlighted Apple's decision to upgrade its 12-inch MacBook as one of the reasons behind the gains.

Apple trailed closely behind ASUS at fifth place in the second-quarter ranking. The updated 12-inch MacBook helped expand MacBook shipments by 17.1 percent from the first quarter to 3.98 million units. TrendForce also anticipates a double-digit sequential growth for third-quarter MacBook shipments as Apple will focus on the MacBook Pro series during the year’s second half.
Global notebook shipments in the second quarter of 2017 registered a sequential quarterly increase of 5.7 percent and a year-on-year increase of 3.6 percent, totaling 39.96 million units. Sales in the U.S. and the arrival of new product models were said to be the main driving forces behind the second quarter shipments, with strong demand in the entire first half of 2017 exceeding market expectations.

Tapping into back-to-school sales, HP's market share increased by 8.5 percent, allowing the company to retain first place in the global shipment ranking for the fifth consecutive quarter, while Dell posted the largest sequential increase of 21.3 percent to take third place in the ranking. Lenovo meanwhile shipped just 8.05 million units in the second quarter, representing a year-on-year drop of 2.4 percent, with slowdown in the notebook market in the Asia-Pacific region said to have had an impact on the brand's performance.


Acer's aggressive expansion in the Chromebook market did little to fend off rival models in the U.S., causing its notebook shipments to drop by 3.5 percent from the first quarter to 3.22 million units, with Acer remaining in sixth place in the global ranking.

TrendForce noted there are worries in the market that the strong shipment result for this year's first half reflects demand pulling ahead, so shipments in the second half might be comparatively weak. Despite that, third-quarter notebook shipments are projected to increase by another 3-5 percent versus the previous quarter.

Apple updated its 13-inch and 15-inch Retina MacBook Pro notebooks in June, introducing faster processors and improved GPUs just eight months after the machines were last refreshed. It also introduced a new low-price 13-inch MacBook Pro sans Touch Bar with a 128GB SSD. No other changes were made to the MacBook Pro.

According to KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, Apple is working on a high-end 15-inch MacBook Pro model that will include 32GB RAM, with production on this machine to begin early in the fourth quarter of 2017. Kuo claimed the MacBook Pro will be "the most significantly redesigned product this year" with desktop-class RAM to appeal to high-end users.

Related Roundups: MacBook Pro, MacBook
Tag: TrendForce
Buyer's Guide: MacBook Pro (Buy Now), MacBook (Buy Now)

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Mophie Launches $150 ‘Powerstation USB-C XXL’ Aimed at New MacBooks

Mophie today announced the release of a new high capacity mobile battery called the Powerstation USB-C XXL, which is aimed at the latest MacBook and MacBook Pro models. The accessory includes a 19,500 mAh battery, which Mophie said will provide up to 14 hours of extra battery, or "more than one full charge" to a MacBook.


The Powerstation USB-C XXL includes one USB-C port and one 5V/2.4A USB-A port, so users can simultaneously charge an iPhone or iPad as they charge their MacBook. The top of the accessory is wrapped in a soft-touch fabric, which Mophie said helps keep other devices in a bag safe from scratches when traveling.

Mophie's new accessory can charge a MacBook at full speed thanks to included USB power delivery technology in the USB-C port, which can charge a connected MacBook at rapid charging rates of up to 30 watts. While 30 watts isn't enough to keep up with a MacBook Pro under heavy load, the battery can still recharge a MacBook Pro in sleep mode or at least slow the battery drain while the computer is in use.

Like other Mophie products, the Powerstation USB-C XXL also includes priority charging, so when it's connected to a wall adapter the battery pack will send power to a connected device first, then recharge itself.


Mophie's PowerStation USB-C XXL is available to buy for $149.95 on Mophie.com, Apple.com, and in Apple retail stores beginning today, although it hasn't yet appeared on Apple's website at the time of writing.

It's worth noting that there are other options on the market if you're looking for USB-C battery packs with power delivery specifications, all of which offer higher capacities at prices lower than Mophie's accessory, although Mophie's design standards and favored relationship with Apple contribute toward its products' popularity with consumers.

Related Roundups: MacBook Pro, MacBook
Tag: Mophie
Buyer's Guide: MacBook Pro (Buy Now), MacBook (Buy Now)

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Teardowns Confirm 2nd-Gen Butterfly Keyboard on New MacBook, New MacBook Pro Designs Largely Unchanged

iFixit has posted its teardowns of Apple's new 12-inch MacBook and 13-inch MacBook Pro with Touch Bar, revealing that apart from the advertised performance boosts the models are largely unchanged from the previous models.

The only really notable change comes in the 12-inch MacBook, which Apple has updated with a second-generation butterfly-mechanism keyboard, as found in the 2016 MacBook Pros, according to iFixit. As some readers will remember, Apple's 12-inch notebook debuted in 2015 with a redesigned keyboard that some users criticized for a lack of travel that they felt made it harder to type on.


Apple used a tweaked version of the same keyboard design in its 2016 MacBook Pros, which most users felt was an improvement with "better give", and the same keyboard now adorns the latest MacBook. According to iFixit:
The keyboard trigger looks like a more classic switch this go-around. The plastic butterfly mechanism appears to have thinned out to accommodate the new switch form factor. The keystroke and travel feel about the same to us, so perhaps the real change is reinforcement for repeated use.
Overall, iFixit gave both of Apple's new notebooks a 1 out of 10 on the repairability scale, owing to their soldered-down RAM, processor, and flash storage, along with glued-down batteries. The scores are in contrast to Apple's new 4K 21.5-inch iMac, which was awarded a surprising 3 out of 10 for repairability, thanks to Apple's use of replaceable memory modules and socketed Kaby Lake CPUs.

The refreshed MacBook and MacBook Pro models feature Intel's seventh-generation Kaby Lake processors, improved Intel and AMD graphics options, with the 12-inch laptop also gaining faster SSD storage. The 12-inch MacBook costs $1,299 for the base model, while the base 13-inch Touch Bar Pro costs $1,799. The 15-inch MacBook Pro pricing begins at $2,399.

Related Roundups: MacBook Pro, MacBook
Tag: iFixit
Buyer's Guide: MacBook Pro (Buy Now), MacBook (Buy Now)

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New MacBook and iMac Models Now Widely Available at Apple Stores With Pickup

Apple's latest MacBook, MacBook Pro, and iMac models are now widely available at all but a few of its retail stores across the United States, and customers now have the option to reserve a model for in-store pickup on its website.


Apple began accepting online orders for the new MacBook, MacBook Pro, and iMac models on Monday, but delivery estimates currently range between June 12 and June 22 in the United States, so customers looking to purchase a new Mac earlier than next week may have better luck visiting an Apple Store.

Apple's in-store pickup tool shows the new MacBook, MacBook Pro, and iMac models are also in stock today at select Apple Stores in Canada, but we recommend calling ahead to ensure supplies remain available.

The refreshed MacBook and MacBook Pro models feature Intel's seventh-generation Kaby Lake processors, improved Intel and AMD graphics options, and faster SSD storage, while the new iMac models received the same treatment plus Thunderbolt 3 ports and brighter Retina displays compared to the previous generation.


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iMac and MacBook Early Reviews: Iterative Updates With Welcome Performance Boosts

At the WWDC keynote on Monday, Apple announced a collection of hardware refreshes for the MacBook, MacBook Pro, and iMac, which users are already able to order on Apple.com. Across the line of Macs, Apple added faster Kaby Lake processors, faster SSD options, made a Fusion Drive standard in the iMac, introduced more maximum RAM in the iMac, and improved GPUs.

Now, the company has allowed members of the press to test out both the MacBook and iMac refreshes to see how the computers stack up in comparison to the previous generation, as well as to Apple's competition. Below we'll round up opinions on the MacBook, 21.5-inch iMac, and 27-inch iMac. As many sites noted, first impressions and reviews for the all-new iMac Pro aren't expected to arrive until later in the year, ahead of the computer's December launch.

12-inch MacBook


Apple sent reviewers the base 1.2GHz Core m3 model ($1,299) of the new 12-inch MacBook, and CNET came away largely impressed by the slightly beefed up machine. The site noted that the biggest and most welcome addition was found in the new and improved keyboard with a second generation butterfly mechanism, which has been adopted from the same keyboard on the MacBook Pro line from last year.
Now the 12-inch MacBook has adopted that improved second-gen butterfly mechanism from the Pro line. Even using it in just a few initial typing sessions, I can totally tell the difference -- there's a click and spring to the keyboard that was lacking before. As someone who has typed hundreds of thousands of words across both previous generations of the 12-inch MacBook, I'm very pleasantly surprised by how good this keyboard feels.
Otherwise, CNET liked the default Intel Core m3 CPU in the MacBook, which remains fine for activities like web browsing and streaming video but still lacks any sort of power needed for heavy multitasking or high-end video editing. Upgraded configurations of the MacBook are available with 1.3GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 ($1,599) and dual-core Core i7 ($1,749), along with available RAM bumps from 8GB to 16GB ($200), but Apple has kept review units focused on the base tier. All versions retain the MacBook's slim 2.03lb body and Retina display.

Image via CNET

Both The Verge and CNET noted that power users will remain disappointed with the MacBook, which still only has one USB-C port. But for everyday tasks and low-power activities, anyone who can get over the port and power limitations should still find a lot of usage out of the 12-inch MacBook in its third generation.

The Verge:
The big question a lot of people are asking is whether the little MacBook is finally over that power hump that’s kept users from switching over to it. I sadly cannot answer that for you, but my hunch is that the basic calculus isn’t going to change. If you need speed, get a MacBook Pro or a Windows PC or maybe even a MacBook Air.
CNET:
The improved keyboard and the faster CPU options feel like a real step forward, although the system is still not quite as updated as we'd like.

You're still stuck with the same not-great 480p webcam, and there's just that single USB-C port for all your power and connectivity needs, which will be a deal-breaker for many. But if you can work with those limitations, this is the best version of the 12-inch MacBook yet.
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