Amazon Go is coming, so it’s time to learn how to bag your own damn groceries

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Amazon Go is coming, and that means you’re finally going to have to bag your own groceries.

*gasp*

On Monday, Amazon released its new app that aims to revolutionize in-store shopping by allowing users to swipe their phones upon entering a store, scan items along the way and then, well, to put it simply… leave.

Sounds convenient, right? Well, not if you’re a stranger to the self-checkout line and have relied on cashiers to bag your groceries all these years.

With the new Amazon Go app, shopping (like so many other things in life) is about to become totally centered around your smartphone. With Amazon Go’s new “Just Walk Out” technology, customers won’t have to wait in those pesky checkout lines, which means there will no longer be a need for cashiers. Read more…

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Amazon’s grocery store disruption has a very human problem

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When Amazon unveiled plans on Tuesday for grocery stores without cashiers, it seemed like an omen of the future: A store full of shoppers, with just a few workers in the background.

Are the robots coming for our jobs? (Some of them.) Is Amazon Go the future? (Probably.)

And yes: It could create some jobs, too. But as for the jobs it’ll leave behind, that’s where bad news gets worse. It’s not just that Amazon’s grocery-buying disruption will cost jobs—it’s that the people who rely on those jobs are already our country’s most economically vulnerable. It’s a bad situation made worse. 

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Amazon Go is a much better idea than delivery drones

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I wanted to dismiss Amazon Go as another Jeff Bezos attention play. But I was wrong. This is the shopping experience we’ve all been waiting for. Amazon is the most important retailer in the country, and when it tries to transform how we shop and receive products, people listenI listen.

When Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos went on 60 Minutes a few years ago to unveil his plans for drone delivery, I had a million questions and almost zero faith that they would ever make it happen. Delivery drones like Amazon’s proposed Prime Air must be fairly large, they’re loud and, in most neighborhoods, will always feel invasive. And the FAA is never going to cooperate. Delivery of one product by drone isn’t even particularly efficient. If nothing else, Amazon is an incredibly efficient product delivery service. I can order five products this morning and receive some or all of them within 48 hours (and sometimes sooner). Read more…

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‘Amazon Go’ Stores Will Let You Grab Groceries and Go, No Checkout Needed

Apple customers may be familiar with the option of walking into an Apple retail store, purchasing a product with the Apple Store app, and walking out without checking out or even speaking to a single employee, and now Amazon seeks to one-up that experience with a new concept called Amazon Go.


Amazon Go provides a checkout-free shopping experience that, to the naked eye, looks exactly like shoplifting. After scanning a smartphone upon entering a store, the app automatically detects when products are taken from or returned to the shelves and keeps track of them in a virtual cart.

Amazon Go says the app utilizes computer vision, sensor fusion, and deep learning, allowing customers to simply take what they want and go with no checkouts or lines required. Shortly after, Amazon will charge a customer's Amazon account and send a receipt, meaning that, unlike the Apple Store app, shoppers do not even need to be in the store during the actual payment process.

Amazon did not provide any further details, so beyond that it remains unclear exactly how the process works.

For now, Amazon Go is limited to Amazon employees in the company's beta program, while only one Amazon Go food store in the company's hometown of Seattle—at 2131 7th Ave—currently supports the app. Amazon Go will open to the public in early 2017, possibly signaling the app's expansion to other stores.

All customers need is an Amazon account, a supported smartphone, and the free Amazon Go app. Amazon informed MacRumors the app will likely support iPhone, and presumably Android-based smartphones as well.


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IBM predicted Amazon Go back in 2006

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Amazon’s splashy video for Amazon Go — an all-seeing, all-knowing store where customers can grab items, toss ’em in a bag or pocket and just walk out without ever waiting in line — has obvious appeal. So obvious, in fact, that another tech company proposed the exact same concept more than 10 years ago.

An IBM ad showcasing a smart store got major circulation on the airwaves in 2006 (when YouTube was nascent). It features a nefarious-looking character in a trench coat wandering the aisles of a supermarket, stuffing his pockets with items as other patrons and security guards shoot him looks of suspicion. As he exits the store through what looks like a security gate that “flashes” him, the guard calls out, “Excuse me, sir!” Read more…

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Amazon just teased the future of in-store shopping

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Amazon wants to help you shop with just your smartphone. 

Right. They’ve already done that. But in addition to revolutionizing online shopping, the tech giant is making moves in brick and mortar.

On Monday, the tech giant unveiled Amazon Go, its new initiative for in-store shopping. The first store opened in Seattle, Amazon’s headquarters and offers breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks. 

At Amazon’s stores, customers don’t need to wait in line or checkout formally. There are no cashiers. Customers simply use Amazon’s new Go app.  Read more…

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