New Apple Park Drone Video Shows Off Steve Jobs Theater as Lobby Lights Up

Drone videographer Duncan Sinfield has posted a new video on his YouTube channel today, giving viewers a fresh look at Apple Park as a small number of employees begin settling into the campus and more buildings take shape. It's been nearly two years since Sinfield originally started providing monthly drone footage for what was previously referred to as "Apple Campus 2."

Now, Sinfield's late June 2017 update provides a glimpse into Apple's ongoing construction progress at Apple Park, including a noticeable progression in the number of trees and other pieces of greenery within the "spaceship" building's circular courtyard. Early on in the video, viewers can also catch a shot of the main atrium of Apple Park, with its floor-to-ceiling glass doors that originally began to take shape in November 2016.


Notably, the new drone footage provides one of the best looks yet into the Steve Jobs Theater, with Sinfield gathering footage of the campus auditorium as lights turn on inside. The lobby of the theater is visible in the video, thanks an all-glass construction that offers visitors a 360-degree view of Apple Park. On two sides of the lobby, spiraling stairs lead downward to the underground auditorium where Apple will host future events.

In last month's drone video update, provided by Matthew Roberts, the Steve Jobs Theater still had multiple window coverings and construction equipment housed inside, so Apple is making fast progress on the building. The company has yet to confirm when the auditorium will officially open, but it's expected to sometime later in the fall.


The Steve Jobs Theater is capped with the world's largest freestanding carbon-fiber roof, and sits atop a hill at one of the highest points of the 175-acre campus. When Apple announced Apple Park's official name back in February, along with the new name for the auditorium, CEO Tim Cook commemorated Jobs and the new Steve Jobs Theater by saying, "Steve’s vision for Apple stretched far beyond his time with us. He intended Apple Park to be the home of innovation for generations to come."


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Apple Park’s Senior Arborist Recalls Meeting Steve Jobs, Sourcing 9K Trees Over 7 Years

Although Apple Park has opened to a small group of employees, the site's buildings and landscaping remain in ongoing construction around the campus. In a new interview with Backchannel, Apple Park's senior arborist, David Muffly, has provided insight into the work it's taken to choose, locate, and plant 9,000 trees at Apple Park, as well as detailed his first interactions with former Apple CEO Steve Jobs.

Jobs discovered Muffly's work during walks he would take around a large satellite dish on Stanford’s campus, admiring as he went hundreds of native oak trees along the path. He made Apple headhunters find the arborist responsible for planting the trees, leading to Muffly, who at the time was working a job pruning lemon trees in Menlo Park.

David Muffly

The two were said to have hit it off "within 20 minutes of meeting," where Jobs described what would see a grand opening seven years later as Apple Park. Muffly and Jobs met in 2010, and in 2011 Muffly was granted the official title of "senior arborist" at Apple.
Within 20 minutes of meeting, it was clear that the arborist and the technologist were on the same wavelength about trees. Jobs told Muffly that he wanted to create a microcosm of old Silicon Valley, a landscape reenactment of the days when the cradle of digital disruption had more fruit trees than engineers.

In one sense, the building would be an ecological preservation project; in another sense, it’d be a roman a clef written in soil, bark, and blossom. Muffly, who had been sensitive to the native growth of the region for years, got it immediately. “That’s what I’ve been doing — planting fruit trees, oak trees,” he said.
Eventually, Muffly was shown early design drawings of Apple Park and the arborist realized the full scope of the project. While thousands of workers would be focusing on the construction of the campus' architecture, he and a small team of landscaping experts would face the full brunt of responsibility for what Jobs considered one of the most important parts of the site: the trees.
And he began to get a sense of the massiveness of the project — hundreds of architects and untold numbers of contractors would wind up working on the building, an edifice that might well become as iconic to California as the pyramids are to Egypt. But the campus itself was meant to be a statement on nature. And that would be his job.

Yeah, there’s that building, he thought. But there’s a lot more trees than buildings. There’s going to be, like, 5,000 people making that building. And it’s going to be just me and my friends doing the trees. “So right off the bat, I was like, Whoooaa. This is as real as it gets.”
Muffly eventually began working with Philadelphia-based landscape architecture firm The Olin Studio to make Jobs' vision a reality at Apple Park. The team agreed that Apple Park should be stocked with trees and greenery "that might thrive in drought conditions brought about by climate change," as well as diversifying the variety of trees on the campus with native trees as the backbone of the ecosystem and then less common genetics dispersed throughout Apple Park.

As Muffly worked with Jobs in the early planning of Apple's new campus, before the late CEO's passing in 2011, he was impressed with Jobs' knowledge of trees. "He had a better sense than most arborists," Muffly said, and at his official pitch to the Cupertino City Council, Jobs promised an increase from the 3,700 trees on the site to 6,000 before the project's completion.


To fill the revised goal of 9,000 trees on the site, Muffly eventually scoured Christmas tree farms across California.
...When Muffly began his work, he realized that nearly all the (non-indigenous) existing trees would have to go. “It was all junk trees and parking lots here,” he says. “So it was a long process. Over the next year or so. I surveyed the trees and picked out about a hundred of them that I felt were worth moving. And we had to stretch to get a hundred out of the [roughly 4,000] existing trees.”

Muffly looked at the redwoods at some abandoned Christmas tree farms up on Skyline, but the soil was too rocky to grow them to Apple’s specifications. “So I sent all my little tree elves to help me, telling them we need big trees we can transport to the site. Next thing I know we’re finding these in two abandoned Christmas tree farms in the Mojave Desert, Yermo, and Adelanto. Who knew there were Christmas tree farms in the Mojave?” Apple actually bought the Yermo site.
All of the landscaping work for Apple Park eventually created shortages for other companies attempting to buy trees in the area, with a report by the San Francisco Chronicle earlier this year stating that, "Buying trees is a surprisingly cutthroat business."

In a behind-the-scenes look at Apple Park last month, one architect reminisced about Jobs' particular fondness for trees: to the late CEO, "trees were the most beautiful bits of art," said architect Stefan Behling. "He used to say, 'The most amazing thing about trees is it doesn't actually matter how rich you are: You can never buy a really old, beautiful tree.'"

You can read the full Backchannel interview with David Muffly right here.


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Latest Apple Park Drone Video Catches a Glimpse of Historic Glendenning Barn

This morning Matthew Roberts shared a new drone video of Apple Park on his YouTube channel, representing the latest addition to the drone videographer's ongoing monthly aerial coverage of Apple's new campus. Roberts' Apple Park coverage dates back to March 2016, and fellow drone pilot Duncan Sinfield has been providing aerial footage for Apple's new workspace since 2015.

In the new video, a closer glimpse at the Steve Jobs Theater is provided, with some of the window coverings having been removed since the last update. The auditorium is still one of the areas of the campus that's under heavy construction, as it isn't expected to officially open until sometime later this year.


Roberts also captured one of the first glimpses of the historic Glendenning Barn that Apple has finished reconstructing and placed at Apple Park. Built in 1916, the historic Cupertino barn has deep ties to the city's agricultural past and was located at the planned site for Apple Campus 2.

During preparation for the construction of Apple Park, Apple carefully deconstructed the building plank by plank and made notes on how to rebuild it exactly the same. Now, the company has done just that and remade the Glendenning Barn at Apple Park, residing next to the employee fitness center and in the middle of what will eventually be a larger collection of fruit trees once landscaping on the campus is finished.


Other spots at Apple Park highlighted in Roberts' new video include the parking garage, R&D facility, and the Spaceship building itself. Yesterday, Apple quietly updated Apple Maps to include 3D models of these buildings in the mapping app, as well as access roads around Apple Park.

Apple recently gave Wired a behind-the-scenes look into Apple Park, including tidbits about Steve Jobs' connection to the campus, a look into the "Ring" building's original design, and detailed images of the campus' construction and interiors.


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Apple Maps Now Shows Apple Park 3D Models, Campus Walkways

Apple has quietly updated its Maps app to include additional 3D coverage of the new Apple Park campus location in Cupertino, California.

The enhanced detail includes a "Map" view with 3D building models as well as access roads running in and out of the campus. Traffic directions, pedestrian walkways, and other information can also be found when searching the area.


In addition, the company has added some new points of interest for Apple Park, such as the Steve Jobs Theater, the research and development facility, the staff fitness center, and above-ground parking. The manmade pond that lies within the walls of the main building also features.

Apple has gradually been adding Maps location information and satellite imagery for Apple Park since March. The company has already started moving thousands of staff to the new campus while landscaping and exterior work to the central office building continues, as evidenced in recent drone footage.

Apple Park began as an idea by the late former CEO Steve Jobs, who pitched the plans for the campus to the Cupertino City Council in 2011, with a completion date for 2015. Demolition on the proposed site began in 2013, but construction delays pushed back a late 2016 opening to the spring of 2017.

(Via AppleInsider.)


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Behind-The-Scenes Look Into Apple Park Shares Up Close Photos, Sketches, and History of New Campus

In a new article by Wired today, Apple has shared the first in-depth look inside its new Apple Park campus, providing glimpses into the "Ring" building's original design, up-close images of the campus' construction and interiors, and even personal tidbits about former CEO Steve Jobs' connection to Apple Campus 2. As construction and updates on the site have stretched out over the years, current Apple CEO Tim Cook referred to Apple Park as the company's "biggest project ever."

Jobs' vision of the campus dates back to 2004, when he and Jony Ive began discussing a reimagined headquarters, but it wasn't until the company hired architect Norman Foster in 2009 that the plans began to ramp up. Meetings that Jobs had with architects working on the project lasted five or six hours, "consuming a significant amount of time in the last two years of Jobs’ life." Jobs was so deep into the project that he even knew at what time of year he wanted timber for the campus' walls to be cut.


He also had an idea for creativity-boosting "pods," which would be specified for work, teamwork, socializing, etc, that eventually led to the original design of Apple Park to be represented as a clover leaf, or a propeller. Multiple factors eventually caused Jobs and the designers to push for a basic, circular shape, including the fact pointed out by Jobs' teenage son that the propeller looked like male genitalia from an aerial perspective.
As with any Apple product, its shape would be determined by its function. This would be a workplace where people were open to each other and open to nature, and the key to that would be modular sections, known as pods, for work or collaboration. Jobs’ idea was to repeat those pods over and over: pod for office work, pod for teamwork, pod for socializing, like a piano roll playing a Philip Glass composition. They would be distributed demo­cratically.

Not even the CEO would get a suite or a similar incongruity. And while the company has long been notorious for internal secrecy, compartmentalizing its projects on a need-to-know basis, Jobs seemed to be proposing a more porous structure where ideas would be more freely shared across common spaces. Not totally open, of course—Ive’s design studio, for instance, would be shrouded by translucent glass—but more open than Infinite Loop.
By June 2010, Apple Park began a renewed life as the Spaceship building, or "Ring" as Apple calls it internally, that is now standing in Cupertino. Wired's article goes into the day in 2011 when Jobs, weeks before he passed away, pitched the campus to the Cupertino City Council. "I think we do have a shot," Jobs told the council, "of building the best office building in the world," after mentioning that if Cupertino failed to approve of the company's plans Apple could simply sell all of its property and move to somewhere nearby, like Mountain View.

A sketch of Apple Park's evolution by Norman Foster

Looking back at the fall of 2011, when he succeeded Jobs, Tim Cook remembered the last time he held a conversation with Jobs. Cook said he and Jobs were watching Remember the Titans and discussing the mundane aspects of Apple Park -- like figuring out which employees would reside in the main building -- that nevertheless "was something that gave [Jobs] energy."
Cook recalls the last time he discussed the campus with his boss and friend in the fall of 2011. “It was actually the last time I spoke to him, the Friday before he passed away,” Cook says. “We were watching a movie, Remember the Titans. I loved it, but I was so surprised he liked that movie. I remember talking to him about the site then. It was something that gave him energy. I was joking with him that we were all worried about some things being difficult, but we were missing the most important one, the biggest challenge of all.”

Which was?

“Deciding which employees are going to sit in the main building” and which would have to work in the outer buildings. “And he just got a big laugh out of it.”
The rest of the article goes into deep detail about the design and building materials Apple gathered when constructing Apple Park, and of course all the problems that came with construction. One roadblock was the canopies that are now adorned on the sides of the building, which Jobs was originally not a fan of, but were required to protect the all-glass building from the California sun.

Apple designers, including Ive's own design team, and Foster + Partners architects had to overcome problems like finding the perfect color tint to the canopies, and ensure they had the right curve to deflect rain.


The purpose of the giant glass sliding doors of the Ring's café -- for which Apple even patented a take-home pizza container -- was also inquired about by Wired:
“This might be a stupid question,” I say. “But why do you need a four-story glass door?”

Ive raises an eyebrow. “Well,” he says. “It depends how you define need, doesn’t it?”
Ultimately, the current designers and architects working on the campus believe that its end result represents Steve Jobs' vision exactly as he had it all those years ago. "I would say that the big picture has not changed at all," Foster mentioned. "If Steve could reappear, it would be as he conceived it when he last saw it as drawings. He’d find some of the details that were not addressed in his lifetime, but I believe he’d approve them."

The rest of Wired's look into Apple Park is worth a read, as it explores nearly every aspect of the campus' construction, from the staircases, ventilation, door handles, text fonts in the elevators, and more. According to Ive, "This is our home, and everything we make in the future is going to start here."


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New Apple Park Drone Video Recaps Construction Progress Made Over the Past Year

Drone videographer Matthew Roberts today uploaded a new video about Apple Park, this time showcasing the construction progress that Apple has made on its new campus over the past year. The video starts in June 2016 and goes up through Roberts' most recent drone updates in April and May 2017, where last minute pieces of construction were being put into place as the first small batch of employees moved into the new workspace.

Roberts separated the video to focus on the major buildings and features at Apple Park, allowing viewers to watch all the progress that has been made on the central "Spaceship" building, Steve Jobs Theater, main tunnel, R&D facility, fitness center, parking garage, and atrium. Even the large mound of dirt that loomed over the site during the first weeks of construction gets some focus in the video.


Apple Park began as an idea by former CEO Steve Jobs, who pitched the plans for the campus to the Cupertino City Council in 2011, with a completion date for 2015. Demolition on the site began in 2013, and construction delays eventually pushed back a late 2016 opening to the spring of 2017. In February, Apple officially named the campus "Apple Park."

Construction is still ongoing at the campus, with the Steve Jobs Theater expected to open sometime later in the year, and small landscaping details continuing to be worked on as more employees move into the buildings. Eyes have been on Apple Park's construction since it began, with interesting coverage including nighttime footage, aerial photography, and even a recreation of the campus in Minecraft.


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New Apple Park Drone Video Shows Off Last Minute Construction as Opening Draws Near

Drone videographer Matthew Roberts has posted a new video on his YouTube channel this morning, covering the ongoing progress of construction at Apple's soon-to-open campus, Apple Park. A few weeks ago, Roberts posted what was expected to be the final update before Apple Park's grand opening, but the campus still hasn't opened its doors to employees with just a few days left in April.

Ever since Apple officially announced the name for Apple Park back in February, construction on the site has ramped up rapidly over the ensuing weeks. Today, solar panel installation on the roof of the central "Spaceship" building appears nearly complete, while the courtyard of the building is still seeing major construction related to the large pond and surrounding greenery.


Landscaping everywhere on the campus has been expanding over the past few weeks, so much so that Apple has caused tree shortages for other companies in the area. In Roberts' newest video, it's evident that there is still much time left for Apple's landscaping to be finished, which will eventually end with 9,000 native and drought-resistant trees spread across the site.

The continuation of landscaping, as well as construction on some of Apple Park's auxiliary buildings, will continue into the summer, well after Apple moves the first employees into the main building. While some of the side buildings are complete -- like the parking garage -- a few still have a ways to go, including the new campus auditorium, which has been named the "Steve Jobs Theater" in honor of the late CEO.

Once employees begin moving in, it's estimated to take Apple around six months to move in all the workers coming to Apple Park, which will number about 13,000. Earlier in April, another well-known drone videographer, Duncan Sinfield, shared off a video of what Apple Park looks like when it's lit up at night.


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New Drone Footage Shows Nearly Complete Apple Park Campus at Night

Apple Park, Apple's second campus in Cupertino, California, is set to have its grand opening this month, and ahead of its official debut, last minute construction and landscaping is continuing on at a rapid pace.

As part of a mid-month update, drone pilot Duncan Sinfield has shared a new video of Apple Park, this time getting some gorgeous nighttime shots of the campus lit up at night. In the evenings, the lights on the ring-shaped main building stay on, and it's an impressive sight.


The nighttime shots are towards the end of the video, which also shows the completed parking structures, landscaping work with hundreds of trees being planted, final construction on the main building, furniture installation, and more.


While employees are set to start working at Apple Park at some point in April, landscaping and construction on auxiliary buildings will continue into the summer.


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Apple Park Drone Update Provides Final Glimpses Into Construction Progress Before April Grand Opening

As we enter April and the official opening of Apple's latest campus, Apple Park, drone videographer Matthew Roberts today shared the latest aerial update on the construction progress for the site -- an update that is expected to be the last before Apple Park opens.

In the video, more solar panels sit atop the main circular building's roof awaiting installation, showing that construction on the site will be down to the wire ahead of employees' move-in date, which has yet to be specified by Apple beyond the month of April.


Around the campus, the Tantau Avenue parking garage is nearing completion while internal additions are finally being added, with Roberts' drone catching glimpses of office chairs and desks in the R&D Facility. Other areas are far from completion, like the newly christened "Steve Jobs Theater," which isn't expected to open until later this year.

Roberts' video also notes that "more prep for the pond has been occurring" within the large, central courtyard of Apple Park, and landscaping is ramping up ahead of the April grand opening. Nearby at the main building, staircases have been installed leading up to the entryway atrium.

MacRumors has been following Apple's progress on Apple Campus 2 for years, dating back to when late CEO Steve Jobs pitched the idea for the campus in 2011, to the day demolition began on the site in 2013. In February, Apple officially named the campus "Apple Park" and revealed its opening date would be coming sometime in April, with construction on various buildings continuing after employees move in.


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New Video Shares First Drone Footage Since Recent ‘Apple Park’ Announcement

In the first drone update since Apple officially named its Spaceship campus "Apple Park," Matthew Roberts has shared an ongoing look at the progress of the campus as it grows ever closer to the official employee move-in date in April. The last collection of video updates came at the end of January and saw walkways, lamps, and parking lots beginning to appear on the site.

Now, the R&D center is "as polished as ever," according to Roberts' newest aerial update video. On the vehicle garages, solar panel installation is finally at 100 percent completion, while the main circular building has received more solar panels but progress on that front has yet to be completed.


As is usual for these updates, landscaping efforts are a major part of the continued construction on the site. Now, more trees have appeared above the underground tunnel and workers are prepping the area to finish the meadows surrounding the campus. The walkways part of last month's update can be seen cutting through the campus as well -- in total there will be 2 miles of walkways at Apple Park.

Other updates include "major changes" to the fitness center and the ongoing progress to the large courtyard inside of the main building. In the center, more drought resistant trees have been planted and more landscape features have appeared. More than 12,000 employees will work at Apple Park, including company CEO Tim Cook.

In its official announcement last week, Apple mentioned that the theater at Apple Park will be named the "Steve Jobs Theater" after the late CEO, who would have turned 62 last Friday. The theater is one of the buildings that won't be open when the campus begins moving employees in this April, and is expected to officially be ready later this year.


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