Evernote Introduces Touch Bar Support on New MacBook Pros For Quick Note Adding

Note-taking app Evernote today announced that users on the 2016 MacBook Pro will now be able to use Touch Bar commands to browse, edit, and customize their notes within the app. Notably, the company said that the addition of Touch Bar support will give users quick access to key navigation features and note editing commands found within Evernote.


To announce the update, Evernote has given users a list of five ways they can use the Touch Bar in the note-taking app, including a new one-tap feature that lets users create new notes faster. Also found on the Touch Bar will be a search button, a customized list of tags, a color slider, and a collection of markup tools to add annotations into notes. The update should begin appearing throughout the day.

Late last year Evernote faced user backlash when it announced a new privacy policy that would let staff members read personal notes taken in the app "to improve the service." Many users threatened to stop using Evernote, and in response the company quickly backpedaled and announced that it would not implement the controversial policy.

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Evernote Will Not Implement Controversial New Privacy Policy

evernoteEvernote tonight announced that it no longer plans to implement a controversial new privacy policy that caused some Evernote users to threaten to stop using the service. The policy was scheduled to go into effect on January 23, 2017 and allowed Evernote employees to read users' notes.
After receiving a lot of customer feedback expressing concerns about our upcoming Privacy Policy changes over the past few days, Evernote is reaffirming its commitment to keep privacy at the center of what we do. As a result, we will not implement the previously announced Privacy Policy changes that were scheduled to go into effect January 23, 2017.
Evernote explained that the new privacy policy was intended to let employees read notes to make sure machine learning algorithms were working as intended. The privacy policy itself only states that employees could look at notes "for troubleshooting purposes or to maintain and improve the Service," wording that was criticized as too vague.

The company attempted to clarify its statements earlier today with a note from CEO Chris O'Neill, promising that the company is still committed to user privacy and the "Three Laws of Data Protection."

Instead of instituting the new policy, Evernote says it will revise its existing privacy policy to address concerns and "reinforce that [users'] data remains private by default." In regards to its machine learning algorithms, Evernote says employees will not read notes unless users opt-in to help the company "build a better product."

Evernote CEO Chris O'Neill also issued a statement, saying the company must ask for permission from its users rather than assume it already has it.
“We announced a change to our privacy policy that made it seem like we didn’t care about the privacy of our customers or their notes. This was not our intent, and our customers let us know that we messed up, in no uncertain terms. We heard them, and we’re taking immediate action to fix it,” said O’Neill. “We are excited about what we can offer Evernote customers thanks to the use of machine learning, but we must ask for permission, not assume we have it. We’re sorry we disappointed our customers, and we are reviewing our entire privacy policy because of this.”
The full statement can be read at Evernote's website.


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Evernote’s New Privacy Policy Lets Staff Read Customers’ Notes ‘to Improve the Service’

evernoteSome users of Evernote have threatened to stop using the note-taking service after the company announced a new privacy policy scheduled to go into effect on January 24 that effectively allows employees to read customers' notes.

The policy changes are related to machine learning algorithms, says Evernote, which are being tested on user content that the company has accumulated since going into operation. Specifically, Evernote explained that staff may need to read customer notes in order to ensure the algorithms are working as they should.
The latest update to the Privacy Policy allows some Evernote employees to exercise oversight of machine learning technologies applied to account content. While our computer systems do a pretty good job, sometimes a limited amount of human review is simply unavoidable in order to make sure everything is working exactly as it should.
In describing this position more succinctly, Evernote's privacy policy states that employees will look at notes "for troubleshooting purposes or to maintain and improve the Service". But some users are concerned about the vague wording of the clause, which journalist Stacy-Marie Ishmael has called "so broad as to be all inclusive". Meanwhile, some users have taken to social media to join a growing chorus of revolt.

Evernote says that only a limited number of employees who have undergone background checks will be able to access note content and that users can encrypt notes to prevent staff from reading them.

But while users can opt out of having their notes reviewed for machine learning purposes, Evernote can still access content for other reasons, including violations of terms of service, to protect the rights, property, or personal safety of Evernote and its users, or to comply with law enforcement requests, warrants, or court orders.

Users can read more about the new changes to Evernote's privacy policy here.


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