Facebook is developing AI to bust ‘offensive’ Live video: report

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Facebook has long been vigilant about keeping your News Feed free of “inappropriate” content. That’s relatively simple when you’re talking about material that can be reviewed in full after it’s posted — but what happens if something goes wrong during a livestream? 

A new initiative is reportedly in the works to build up the social network’s flagging system for offensive content in a particularly difficult area: Facebook Live. 

Facebook has previously relied in part on a system that depended on users to report offensive materials, which are then checked by Facebook employees against “community standards.”  Read more…

More about Censorship, Livestream, Artificial Intelligence, Facebook Live, and Tech

Facebook’s being a bully again, this time over Prisma’s live video filters

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In yet another case of “giant tech company choking out startup,” Facebook has reportedly blocked Prisma‘s super gnarly art filters from working with Facebook Live videos.

Facebook claims the Prisma app’s use of its Live Video API doesn’t comply with terms and conditions, according to TechCrunch. Facebook claims the API is only for publishing live video from non-mobile devices such as professional cameras and drones.

“Your app streams video from a mobile device camera, which can already be done through the Facebook app. The Live Video API is meant to let people publish live video content from other sources such as professional cameras, multi-camera setups, games or screencasts,” Facebook told Prisma. Read more…

More about Filters, Video, Facebook Live, Prisma, and Facebook