Google Adds New Family Sharing Features to Calendar, Keep, and Photos

Google expanded the range of family sharing features across a handful of its digital services on Tuesday. The new additions rolled out to Google Calendar, Google Keep, and Google Photos.

Setting up a family group in Google Calendar now automatically generates a "Family Calendar" for users to keep track of group activities like picnics, movie nights, and reunions, all in one place.


The new feature in Google Keep works similarly. Users add a family group as a collaborator for any note, which allows everyone to edit and make changes to shopping lists, to-dos, and the like. A family group icon (a house with a heart at its center) appears next to any note that is shared in this way.

Lastly, in Google Photos, a new "Family Group" option in the Share menu lets users share selected photos with family members.

To use the new family sharing features, a Google Play Family Library needs to be set up. This can be done in the Play Store app: tap the top-left menu icon and select Account -> Family -> Sign up for Family Library.

Users can share apps, games, movies, TV shows, and books purchased from Google Play with up to 5 family members using Google Play Family Library. Each member of the family has to follow the same steps to activate their membership in the group.


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Too many mental health apps put style over substance

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We share some of our most intimate data with mental health apps, but there’s surprisingly little proof of what they give us in return.

Many medical experts are starting to find problematic the lack of clear science backing up apps that promise to help with everything from low mood to depression.

Bruce Bolam, program director at VicHealth, oversaw a recent review of more than 300 health and wellbeing apps.

While he praised the dynamism of a “free market of smartphone apps,” Bolam explained that while many apps scored top marks when it came to design and gamification, the science behind their treatment method was a lot weaker. Read more…

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