iPhone 8 Expected to Include Faster 10W USB-C Wall Charger

Earlier this year, Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo of KGI Securities said the widely rumored 5.8-inch iPhone with an OLED display will feature a Lightning connector with USB-C Power Delivery that enables fast charging capabilities.

"iPhone 8" mockup by Benjamin Geskin for iDrop News

Lending credence to that rumor, Barclays analyst Blayne Curtis today in a research note said the so-called "iPhone 8" will come bundled with a 10W power adapter with a USB-C connector and an integrated USB-C Power Delivery chip.

Curtis said the USB-C Power Delivery chips built into both the iPhone and 10W power adapter will be supplied by Cypress Semiconductor. The research note suggests it'll be the same CYPD2104 chip used in the new 10.5-inch iPad Pro.

An excerpt from the Barclays research note distributed to clients, obtained by MacRumors and edited slightly for clarity:
We believe that in the iPhone 8, Apple likely includes Cypress Semiconductor's USB-C Power Delivery chip in the phone and an additional chip within the power brick in box (likely a new 10W, which would use a more integrated solution with Cypress Power Delivery).
Like the new 10.5-inch and 12.9-inch iPad Pro, the so-called "iPhone 8" would be capable of fast charging with a Lightning to USB-C cable connected to the new 10W power adapter or Apple's 29W USB-C power adapter for MacBook.

Apple will presumably include a Lightning to USB-C cable in the box if it's going in this direction, possibly instead of the traditional Lightning to USB cable. Apple could also opt to include a female USB-C to male USB-A adapter in the box.

Apple's current 5W Power Adapter for iPhone and 12W Power Adapter for iPad both have slower USB-A ports.

Given the "iPhone 8" is expected to have around a 2,700 mAh L-shaped two-cell battery pack, faster charging would be a welcomed addition. The device is also widely rumored to feature wireless charging.

Related Roundup: iPhone 8
Tags: Barclays, USB-C, Lightning

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Pioneer Launches World’s First Lightning-Powered Plug-and-Play Speaker

Pioneer today introduced Rayz Rally, which it claims is the world's first Lightning-powered plug-and-play speaker that has no battery.


The portable speaker can be used to listen to music, but Pioneer is heavily marketing it as a speakerphone for conference calling.

For conference calling, Pioneer says users simply plug the Rally into the Lightning connector, initiate calls from the iPhone, and the call is automatically transferred to the speaker. Despite being small enough to fit in a pocket, the speaker is supposedly loud enough to be used in a boardroom.

The speaker has a single button on the front that can mute/unmute calls or play/pause music depending on what it's being used for. A standard Lightning to USB cable can be plugged into the Rayz Rally to use the speaker with a Mac or PC, or to enable pass-through charging to an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch.


The speaker works in tandem with Pioneer's free Rayz Appcessory Companion App on the App Store [Direct Link] for iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.

Pioneer said the Rayz Rally is available today for $99.95 on Apple.com and at Apple Stores worldwide in the colors Ice, Onyx, and Space Gray. It's also available on Amazon in the United States. Prices vary by country.


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Apple Will Still Include a Lightning to Headphone Jack Adapter With This Year’s iPhones, Says Barclays

Apple will continue to include a Lightning to 3.5mm Headphone Jack Adapter with the trio of new iPhone models rumored to launch later this year, according to Barclays.

"We believe it stays this year but goes away at some point, potentially in the 2018 model," said Barclays analyst Blayne Curtis, and his associates, in a research note distributed today.

Cirrus Logic would remain the primary beneficiary within Apple's supply chain, as it's believed to provide some of the tiny audio-related components inside of the adapter.

Barclays contradicts Japanese blog Mac Otakara, which said Apple will no longer include the adapter in the box with the so-called iPhone 7s, iPhone 7s Plus, and iPhone Edition.

Apple eliminating the 3.5mm headphone jack on the iPhone 7 was a controversial decision, so it's easy to see why it might want to include the adapter in the box for at least another year. But, unlike when the iPhone launched last year, Apple's wireless AirPods and BeatsX earphones are now available.

Apple sells the Lightning to 3.5mm Headphone Jack Adapter for $9 as a standalone accessory, which is cheap by its standards, so customers that still prefer to use wired headphones won't be forced to pay too much extra whether the adapter is removed from the iPhone box this year or later.


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All Three 2017 iPhones Predicted to Have 3GB of RAM and Lightning Connectors With Faster Charging

All three of Apple's rumored 2017 iPhone models will likely have 3GB of RAM, according to Cowen and Company analyst Timothy Arcuri.


An excerpt from Arcuri's late March research note, obtained by MacRumors:
In terms of memory/storage configuration, all three models will likely adopt 3GB RAM; the 4.7”/5.5” will likely have the same storage options as the current iPhone 7/7+ in 32/128/256GB while the 5.8” model looks to be only offered in two memory configurations: 64GB and 256GB. Finally, the 5.8” model will likely have extended battery life with two packs of batteries.
Arcuri's research contradicts Taiwanese research firm TrendForce, which recently said that only the next 5.5-inch iPhone and Apple's rumored 5.8-inch iPhone with an OLED display will have 3GB of RAM. TrendForce said the next 4.7-inch iPhone will continue to have 2GB of RAM like the iPhone 7.

Apple already includes 3GB of RAM in the iPhone 7 Plus, so the 4.7-inch iPhone would be the only model with increased RAM.

If the prediction is accurate, it's welcomed news for customers that plan on purchasing the next 4.7-inch iPhone, rather than spending upwards of $200 more on the so-called "iPhone 8" with an edge-to-edge OLED display.

Increased RAM means an iPhone can store more data in memory. If you have dozens of tabs open in Safari on an older iPhone, for example, you may notice that some of the tabs refresh when you revisit them. But with increased RAM, the likelihood of Safari reloading a website you previously loaded is lower.


Arcuri also corroborated KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo in saying that all three 2017 iPhone models will continue to have Lightning connectors with USB Type-C Power Delivery for faster charging.

Cowen's research is based on his own checks of Apple's supply chain, so his prediction lends credence to the already-reliable Kuo.

The Wall Street Journal previously said the "iPhone 8" will have "a USB-C port for the power cord and other peripheral devices instead of the company’s original Lightning connector." But the report did not provide any additional details, and it appears the Lightning connector will live on.


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One Analyst Thinks the iPhone 8 Will Still Have a Lightning Connector With USB-C Adapter for Europe

The Wall Street Journal today reported that at least one upcoming iPhone model will include a USB-C port instead of a Lightning connector.

If the report is accurate, a single USB-C cable could be used to charge the so-called iPhone 8, 12-inch MacBook, or the latest MacBook Pro models.
People familiar with Apple’s plans said its release this year would include two models with the traditional LCDs and a third one with the OLED screen.

They said Apple would introduce other updates including a USB-C port for the power cord and other peripheral devices instead of the company’s original Lightning connector.
The Wall Street Journal has historically been a reliable source for iPhone rumors, so there is a good chance the report is true.

Nevertheless, the move towards USB-C has yet to be substantiated by other credible sources, and Apple changing the charging port on iPhones for the second time in five years, after switching from the 30-pin Dock Connector to Lightning connector in 2012, would certainly be a controversial decision.

At least one analyst is not convinced that Apple will ditch Lightning on its next iPhones, but he does believe USB-C will be in the mix.

Barclays managing director Blayne Curtis told MacRumors that he expects the iPhone 8 to keep its Lightning connector, while he believes that Apple will sell a Lightning to USB-C adapter in European countries to adhere to the European Commission's "one mobile phone charger for all" campaign.

This adapter would likely be similar to Apple's female-to-male Lightning to Micro-USB adapter, which allows an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch with a Lightning connector to charge and sync with a micro USB cable. Apple sold a similar 30-pin Dock Connector to Micro-USB adapter in Europe to adhere to EU policy.

Many consumers have advocated for Apple to ditch its proprietary Lightning connector in favor of USB-C, which has become a standard feature on several Android smartphones, notebooks, and other devices. Whether it is an all-out USB-C port or yet another adapter remains to be seen, but it seems that Apple might be listening.

Related Roundup: iPhone 8 (2017)
Tags: USB-C, Lightning

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Spidering lightning and red skies are the ominous weather 2016 deserves

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If you’re superstitious about the awfulness of 2016 (see Bowie, Prince, Cohen and Trump), one Australian state’s end-of-days weather over the weekend will only seem appropriate.

Saturday evening brought a spectacular clash of red sunset skies and spidering lightning to southeast Queensland, but also some danger: A teenager was hit by lightning and a number of homes were damaged, ABC reported.

That didn’t stop locals from capturing some impressive snaps and video of the light show, which they were kind enough to share on social media. Read more…

More about Instagram, Lightning, Storm, Brisbane, and Australia