Apple to Phase Out 32-Bit Mac Apps Starting in January 2018

Apple is already putting an end to 32-bit apps on iOS devices with iOS 11, and soon the company will make the same changes on its macOS operating system.

During its Platform State of the Union keynote at the Worldwide Developers Conference, Apple told developers that macOS High Sierra will be the "last macOS release to support 32-bit apps without compromises."


Starting in January of 2018, all new apps submitted to the Mac App Store must be 64-bit, and all apps and app updates submitted must be 64-bit by June 2018. With the next version of macOS after High Sierra, Apple will begin "aggressively" warning users about 32-bit apps before eventually phasing them out all together.

In iOS 11, 32-bit apps cannot be installed or launched. Attempting to open a non-supported 32-bit app gives a message notifying users that the app needs to be updated before it can run on iOS 11.


Prior to phasing out 32-bit apps on iOS 11, Apple gave both end users and developers several warnings, and the company says it will follow the same path for the macOS operating system.

(Thanks, Cameron!)

Related Roundup: macOS High Sierra

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Macs Able to Run macOS Sierra Remain Compatible With High Sierra

Apple on Monday announced macOS High Sierra, the next major version of its operating system for Mac computers.


macOS High Sierra is compatible with any Mac capable of running macOS Sierra, as Apple has not dropped support for any older models this year.

The official list of Mac models compatible with macOS High Sierra:

Late 2009 or Later
2010 or Later

  • MacBook Air
  • MacBook Pro
  • Mac mini
  • Mac Pro
To determine your Mac's model year, click on the Apple logo in the top-left menu bar and select About This Mac.

The first macOS High Sierra beta was released to registered Apple developers on Monday. A public beta will be available in late June through the Apple Beta Software Program. The software update will be officially released in the fall.

Related Roundup: macOS High Sierra

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Apple Seeds First Beta of macOS High Sierra to Developers

Apple today announced new versions of iOS, macOS, tvOS, and watchOS, and following the conclusion of this morning's keynote event, new betas are being distributed to developers. macOS High Sierra beta 1 is now available for download.

The new beta can be downloaded from the Apple Developer Center, and once installed, subsequent betas will be available through the Software Update mechanism in the Mac App Store.


macOS High Sierra builds on the features introduced with macOS Sierra and introduces new core storage, video, and graphics technology. macOS High Sierra supports the new Apple File System (APFS) and High-Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC), plus it introduces an updated version of Metal with VR support.

Photos is gaining a new sidebar that makes it easier to access editing tools and albums, plus there are new editing options like Curves and Selective Color, and it supports external editing apps like Photoshop and Pixelmator.

There are improvements to Safari, including speed improvements and a new feature that blocks tracking data, Siri on the Mac has expanded music capabilities and a new more natural voice, and Spotlight has been updated with flight status information.

At the current time, macOS High Sierra is only available for registered developers. Apple will make a public macOS High Sierra beta available later this summer, giving public beta testers a chance to try out and test the software before it sees a public release in the fall.

Related Roundup: macOS 10.13

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macOS 10.13 Wishlist: Features MacRumors Readers Hope to See in the Next Version of macOS

Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference is set to kick off on June 5, and along with a new version of iOS, Apple is expected to introduce the next-generation version of macOS, macOS 10.13. We've heard no rumors on what to expect in macOS 10.13, so whatever Apple introduces will come as a total surprise.

With iOS 11 expected to get a major design overhaul, we can perhaps count on some similar design tweaks in macOS, but beyond that, there's no word on what's coming. As with iOS 11, our forum members have created a couple of macOS wishlists, outlining some of the features they're hoping to see, and while macOS isn't quite as popular as iOS, there are still some solid ideas.


- Redesigned iTunes/Apple Music - Some MacRumors readers would like to see Apple overhaul iTunes in a big way, splitting out Apple Music and turning it into its own distinct app that's not combined with the App Store and iTunes Store.

- HomeKit - Connected home products can be controlled through Siri or a dedicated Home app on iOS devices, but on the Mac, there's no built-in way to interface with a HomeKit setup. A Home app for the Mac would be a welcome addition, and perhaps the Mac could even serve as a HomeKit hub like the Apple TV and the iPad.

- Expanded Dark Mode - macOS Sierra included a Dark Mode that darkens the dock and the drop down menus across the operating system, but several MacRumors readers would like to see an expanded Dark Mode that darkens all interface elements like Finder and Notification Center.

- Multiple docks - When using multiple displays, it would be nice to have access to separate docks for each display.

- iPad/Apple TV second screen - This is unlikely to happen, but one reader wants to use an iPad or an Apple TV as a second screen for a Mac. This suggestion overlaps with the iOS 11 wishlist, where readers said they would like to be able to use their iPads as a secondary Mac display and as a drawing tablet.

- Combined Siri/Spotlight - Several MacRumors readers would like to see Siri and Spotlight combined on the Mac, allowing for a unified search/Siri experience. With Siri integrated into Spotlight, Mac users would be able to type Siri requests and get the same search result with voice or text. Users also want to see Siri improvements, which could happen as Apple is rumored to be working on new Siri features.

- Better full screen options - For users who like to take advantage of full screen apps, better management options would be welcome. An option to open a new window in Split View from the dock or an iPad-style drag-to-close feature would improve Split View.

- Improved window management - Windows 10-style window snapping is a request that pops up multiple times across the wishlist threads. As one reader points out, window management apps like Magnet are some of the most popular in the Mac App Store, suggesting this is something a lot of Mac users would like to see added to the operating system.

- FaceTime Picture-in-picture - macOS Sierra brought picture-in-picture support to the Mac for videos, but it doesn't extend to FaceTime. That's a problem that prevents FaceTime from being used with a full screen app because the FaceTime video window doesn't stay on top.

- Messages - In macOS, there's no support for stickers or other Messages features. Adding support in the next version of macOS would bring macOS in line with iOS.

- Apple News - The Apple News app is limited to iOS devices, but it could easily be brought over to the Mac as a native app.

What features are you hoping Apple will introduce in macOS 10.13? Join in on the discussion about the update on the MacRumors forums. Make sure to check out our iOS 11 wishlist roundup too.

Related Roundup: macOS 10.13

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Apple Reveals First Public Sign of macOS 10.13

While the next major version of macOS likely won't be announced until the WWDC 2017 opening keynote on June 5, eagle-eyed blogger Pike's Universum has discovered what appears to be Apple's first public sign of macOS 10.13.


Specifically, the blog shared a portion of the App Store URL, otherwise known as a CatalogURL, for macOS 10.13. We were subsequently able to pinpoint the full URL by tweaking an older CatalogURL link, and it appears to be a secure HTTPS link originating from Apple's servers, so the screenshot is legitimate.

The full URL: https://swscan.apple.com/content/catalogs/others/index-10.13seed.merged-1.sucatalog.gz

We don't know much about what's coming in macOS 10.13 at this point, but visits we're receiving from Macs running pre-release versions of macOS 10.13 have been picking up steadily since the beginning of the year, presumably as Apple's engineers work on the operating system update ahead of its unveiling.

Visits to MacRumors from Macs running macOS 10.13

We don't know what the successor to macOS Sierra will be called, but in 2014, Apple trademarked a long list of names that could be used for future updates. Names range from popular beaches and well-known cities in California, where Apple is headquartered, to mountains, deserts, and animals.

A list of known trademarked names that have yet to be used: Redwood, Mammoth, California, Big Sur, Pacific, Diablo, Miramar, Rincon, Redtail, Condor, Grizzly, Farallon, Tiburon, Monterey, Skyline, Shasta, Mojave, Sequoia, Ventura, and Sonoma. An entirely different name is certainly possible too.

macOS 10.13 will likely be seeded to developers for testing purposes in early June ahead of a public release by the end of October. The beta will likely be available to public testers over the summer as well.

Related Roundup: macOS 10.13
Tag: Pike's Universum

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