NASA Shares Ways to Stream the 2017 Solar Eclipse on iOS and Apple TV

On Monday, August 21, all of the continental United States will have the chance to view a solar eclipse, and depending on where you're located you might even be able to see a total solar eclipse. The eclipse's "path of totality" -- or the shadow of the moon as it moves in front of the sun -- will begin in Oregon and end in South Carolina, and anyone sitting outside the path will be witness to a partial solar eclipse.

For this reason, NASA is launching a suite of streaming programs covering the best views of the eclipse and its path of totality, giving anyone a chance to watch on their iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, or Apple TV, particularly those who live far away from the path of totality. NASA Television's "Eclipse Across America" will include vantage points of the eclipse on the ground, from aircrafts, and even from the International Space Station.

Images via NASA

To tune into the live broadcast, there are a few platforms you can choose from: the main NASA app for iOS [Direct Link], and the NASA app for tvOS, which you can download from the App Store on the fourth-generation Apple TV. Android users can watch on Android smartphones, Amazon Fire tablets, and Fire TV devices.

A preview show will kick off at 12:00 p.m. ET, hosted from Charleston, South Carolina, and live coverage will last for four hours. At 1 p.m. ET the main show will begin and continuously cover the path of totality the eclipse will take as it travels across the United States.


The partial eclipse will begin in Oregon at around 9 a.m. PT and totality will occur just over one hour later. The eclipse will then end in South Carolina with a partial eclipse hitting just after 1 p.m. ET and totality occurring approximately between 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. ET. For those in the path of totality, the total solar eclipse will last just a few short minutes (between 2 minutes and 2 minutes and 40 seconds), although the exact duration will vary by location.
The lunar shadow enters the United States near Lincoln City, Oregon, at 9:05 a.m. PDT. Totality begins in the United States in Lincoln City, Oregon, at 10:16 a.m. PDT. The total eclipse will end in Charleston, South Carolina, at 2:48 p.m. EDT. The lunar shadow leaves the United States at 4:09 p.m. EDT. A partial eclipse will be visible throughout the United States.
NASA has created a useful interactive map for finding the times when the eclipse will appear near you, as well as how high the obscuration percentage (percent of totality, with higher being darker) will be in your area.

In regards to eye and camera safety, NASA has a wealth of resources to guide you on viewing and recording the eclipse. The organization suggests that you only purchase solar viewers from its list of reputable retailers and vendors. The safety precautions are particularly aimed at the time of the partial solar eclipse, when sunlight can still be seen in the sky.


There's also a document [PDF] that NASA has created on the subject of eclipse smartphone photography, briefing those interested in capturing the eclipse with various tips on getting the best shots. Without a professional camera, tripod, or telescope, most smartphone shots of the eclipse will likely still come out as images with a tiny bright disc in the sky.

NASA warns that smartphones with wide apertures, between f/1.7 and f/2.0 (in terms of iPhones only the iPhone 7's f/1.8 fits in this range), could face potential damage when pointed directly at the sun for long periods. There are steps that can be taken to avoid such a risk, including simply taking quick snaps of the eclipse, covering the iPhone's lens with solar viewer safety glasses, or investing in telephoto lens attachments.

No matter what, be sure to keep solar glasses on at all times when photographing a partial solar eclipse with either a smartphone or professional camera system.

There are plenty of other apps and platforms that the 2017 solar eclipse will be viewable on, including most major media outlets and their own iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, and Apple TV applications.

Tag: NASA

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple Hires NASA Augmented Reality Expert Jeff Norris

Apple has hired Jeff Norris, an augmented reality expert who founded the Mission Operations Innovation Office at NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab, reports Bloomberg.

Norris has reportedly joined Apple as a senior manager working on the augmented reality team led by Mike Rockwell, who formerly ran Dolby Labs. The team is said to be working on the previously-rumored augmented reality smart glasses as well as AR features for future versions of the iPhone.

Prior to joining Apple, Norris worked at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, where he was employed since 1999. Along with founding the Mission Operations Innovation Office, he founded the JPL Ops Lab for developing human-system interfaces for mission operations, and he led multiple projects focused on human-system interaction with an emphasis on virtual and augmented reality.

On his website, Norris features a speech he gave on augmented reality and Nasa's JPL Ops Lab, much of which was focused on augmented reality headsets and their uses.


Under Norris' leadership, the JPL Ops Lab provided the Microsoft HoloLens to astronauts onboard the International Space Station and developed software for virtually working on Mars with the HoloLens.


For the last couple of years, Apple has taken a deep interest in augmented and virtual reality, and is said to have a large team of employees working on the technologies and exploring ways they could be used in future Apple products.

Apple has been working on both virtual reality headsets and augmented reality smart glasses, with the aim of launching the latter in 2018. We've also heard rumors suggesting augmented reality functionality could be incorporated into the iPhone, perhaps as early as the iPhone 8 set to be released this September.

Apple CEO Tim Cook has expressed his excitement about augmented reality several times in recent months. "I think AR is that big, it's huge. I get excited because of the things that could be done that could improve a lot of lives," he said in February of 2017.

Related Roundup: Apple VR Project
Tags: bloomberg.com, NASA

Discuss this article in our forums

These photos of a hexagon on Saturn are totally real

Https%3a%2f%2fblueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com%2fuploads%2fcard%2fimage%2f311668%2f626ef17c70284c45a95c22f4fbf1c2a1

Feed-twFeed-fb

The Cassini spacecraft has been exploring Saturn, its moons and its rings for more than 10 years, but this week the daring probe did something special. 

On Sunday, Cassini dove just outside Saturn’s main rings as part of its latest mission, which will take it on 20 week-long orbits around the planet

About two days before that dive, Cassini snapped a series of photos showing off a view of Saturn’s strange and beautiful hexagonal weather system in the planet’s northern hemisphere. 

The hexagon-shaped jet stream surrounds a giant storm in Saturn’s north pole, but this isn’t the first time the wild weather has been spotted by Cassini.  Read more…

More about Saturn Photos, Space Photos, Saturn, Cassini, and Nasa

The end of the world: How NASA and FEMA will deal with a killer asteroid

Https%3a%2f%2fblueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com%2fuploads%2fcard%2fimage%2f294453%2f590140main_pia14729-43_full

Feed-twFeed-fb

In the NASA plan to deal with a killer asteroid destroying the world, the first people to learn about it likely find out via text message.

Seriously.

If a killer asteroid on a path to striking Earth were discovered, the first word of its existence would likely come in the form of a text or an email—preliminary information about the space rock, sent out to a group of less than 12 scientists.

At that stage, researchers wouldn’t know much about the size and trajectory of the errant space rock, but that’d change quickly. They’d start hurriedly gathering observations of the object, likely first spotted by one of the large survey telescopes constantly looking out for this kind of thing.  Read more…

More about Space, Killer Asteroid, Asteroid Strike, Asteroids, and Nasa

The sun is your dad

Https%3a%2f%2fblueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com%2fuploads%2fcard%2fimage%2f305267%2f536e1732957546e3bfe4746c106c60c6

Feed-twFeed-fb

The sun looks like a proud, happy dad with a huge smile in new photos beamed back to Earth by a sun-staring spacecraft. 

The new images — taken by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory — show various features of the sun coincidentally coming together to look just like a face with a crooked smile and male-patterned baldness.

All in all, this makes the sun bear a striking resemblance to Frasier Crane or perhaps your father.

The smiley sun photo was first pointed out on Twitter by solar scientist Karl Battams after the Solar Dynamics Observatory’s website was updated with the new photos taken today. Read more…

More about Solar Dynamics Observatory, Space Photos, Sun, Science, and Nasa

Uncrewed Russian spaceship fails, burns up in atmosphere miles above Siberia

Https%3a%2f%2fblueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com%2fuploads%2fcard%2fimage%2f303893%2f52e36cd9cb9c4b58be3f87203b678c83

Feed-twFeed-fb

An uncrewed Russian spacecraft carrying hundreds of pounds of supplies for the crew onboard the International Space Station failed to make it to orbit after launch Thursday. 

The Progress cargo ship failed about 190 kilometers (118 miles) above a remote part of Siberia, with some of the craft burning up in the atmosphere and other pieces likely making it to the ground.

The Progress — launched atop a Soyuz rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan — seemed to be functioning well until a little more than 6 minutes into the launch, when Russian mission control unexpectedly lost touch with the spacecraftRead more…

More about International Space Station, Nasa, Rocket Launch, Rockets, and Russian Rocket

When NASA intentionally crashed a passenger jet, it somehow went even worse than expected

Https%3a%2f%2fblueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com%2fuploads%2fstory%2fthumbnail%2f29508%2fcidthumb

Feed-twFeed-fb

Image: NASA

On Dec. 1, 1984, scientists from NASA and the FAA took a passenger jet out to the desert and crashed it on purpose.

The Controlled Impact Demonstration was an experiment to test a new fuel additive which could potentially reduce catastrophic fuel fires in a crash scenario. The FM-9 additive had shown promise in simulated impacts, but a real test was necessary.

NASA obtained an aging Boeing 720 for the project and brought it out to Rogers Dry Lake at Edwards Air Force Base in California

Crashing a jet was a rare opportunity. In addition to testing the fuel additive, scientists outfitted the cabin with an array of instruments for other survivability experiments, from new seat and luggage bin designs to fireproof materials. Read more…

More about Plane Crash, Air Travel, Airplane, Nasa, and History

Mars is looking good in first photos sent home by new orbiter

Https%3a%2f%2fblueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com%2fuploads%2fstory%2fthumbnail%2f29357%2fscreen_shot_2016-11-29_at_5.09.07_pm

Feed-twFeed-fb

A new satellite orbiting Mars just sent home some amazing new images of the red planet’s crags and cliffs. 

The Trace Gas Orbiter — part of the joint ExoMars mission run by the European Space Agency (ESA) and Russia — beamed back the images gathered on Nov. 22, during the spacecraft’s first close flyby of the world.

Some of the new photos — spliced together in video form — show the details of the Martian surface when the spacecraft was only 235 kilometers (about 146 miles) from the planet’s surface. Others were taken when the spacecraft was flying thousands of kilometers from Mars. Read more…

More about Space Videos, Europe, Space Photos, Mars, and Nasa

NASA unveils ‘food bars’ to feed astronauts on long space journeys

Https%3a%2f%2fblueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com%2fuploads%2fcard%2fimage%2f299001%2fscreen_shot_2016-11-28_at_12.46.44_pm

Feed-twFeed-fb

Your average granola bar simply won’t cut it for a Mars-bound astronaut.

NASA food scientists are in the process of developing a new “food bar” (that’s seriously what they call it) that astronauts will be able to eat for breakfast every morning while on missions to deep space destinations like Mars or the moon. 

At the moment, NASA astronauts have a variety of good tasting — but mostly questionable looking — options for breakfast and other meals on the International Space Station. If NASA crews start flying to the red planet as planned sometime in the 2030s, however, that variety won’t be viable.  Read more…

More about Space, Food, Space Food, Nasa, and Science