Spreading the love: Paris love locks to be sold to help refugees

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Paris is not only the “city of love” but the city of love locks.

The weighty tradition of locking small padlocks to the sides of Paris bridges as a symbol of eternal love became so trendy in the past few years that some crossings were covered with them.

The Pont des Arts bridge in particular became the epicenter of the locking trend and about a year and a half ago, the city starting removing them citing safety reasons.

But now officials are thinking creatively about what to do with the thousands of signed locks.

The city is set to sell batches of the locks with the proceeds going to refugee groups, the Guardian reports. Read more…

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Comic book take on journalism is an essential celebration of the embattled profession

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Like many a Facebook user before the 2016 election, comic book artist Sarah Glidden used to consume a lot of articles without thinking much about where they came from. “I just thought about journalism like it was water,” she says. “You turn on the faucet and it comes out.” 

Then some reporter friends mentioned they were going on a trip to two of the most troubled countries in the world: Iraq and Syria. Glidden tagged along on a tourist visa, curious about the reporting process. 

The journalists, who worked for a daily online magazine now called The Globalist, agreed to have the mirror turned on them. Glidden took her own recorder and filled 8 GB SD card after 8 GB SD card with…well, pretty much everything they said and did, whether it seemed important or not. Her main exception: “I’d probably turn it off if we got really drunk.” Read more…

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