Apple Extends Free Repairs of Anti-Reflective Coating on 2013-2015 MacBook Pro

Apple has extended free repairs of anti-reflective coating issues for the 2013 to 2015 MacBook Pro with Retina display.


Apple has authorized coverage within four years from an affected MacBook Pro's original date of purchase, according to an internal document distributed to Apple Authorized Service Providers and later obtained by MacRumors.

Both 13-inch and 15-inch MacBook Pro models released in 2013, 2014, or 2015 qualify for a free display replacement within the four-year coverage period. Apple says all 2012 models are no longer eligible for free repairs since both the 13-inch and 15-inch models were discontinued by October 2013.

Below is a list of the absolute latest dates that each MacBook Pro model may remain eligible for coverage based on when each was discontinued:

• 2013 13-inch MacBook Pro: July 2018
• 2013 15-inch MacBook Pro: July 2018
• 2014 13-inch MacBook Pro: March 2019
• 2014 15-inch MacBook Pro: May 2019
• 2015 13-inch MacBook Pro: October 2020
• 2015 15-inch MacBook Pro: Still sold

Apple previously confirmed to us that the repair program continues to be handled internally rather than being publicly announced.

Affected customers can schedule a Genius Bar appointment at an Apple Store using the Apple Support app. Or, on the Get Support page, click Mac → Mac Notebooks → Hardware Issues → Display Issue and options should be presented to initiate a repair or contact Apple via phone, email, or online chat.

Apple's support website will ask for your Mac's serial number, which can be found by clicking on the Apple logo in the top-left corner of the screen and clicking on About This Mac in the dropdown menu.

Affected customers can also visit an Apple Authorized Service Provider to determine if their notebook is eligible for coverage. If you have already incurred out-of-warranty costs related to this issue, you may be eligible for a refund, which can be initiated by contacting Apple support directly.

Since the repair program has not been publicly announced, some Apple support representatives may be unaware of its existence. Escalating your request to a senior advisor may help, but your mileage may vary.

Apple first began the repair program in October 2015, and has now extended it twice, after some MacBook Pro owners experienced issues with the anti-reflective coating wearing off or delaminating on the Retina display.

The damage appears to be caused by a variety of factors, including the pressure of the keyboard and trackpad on the display when closed, and the use of incorrect third-party cleaning solutions with microfiber cloths.

Over 12,000 customers joined a Facebook group dedicated to the issue, and hundreds of others have claimed to be affected across the Apple Support Communities, MacRumors forums, Twitter, Reddit, and other discussion platforms.

The website Staingate.org contains a gallery of MacBook Pro models with seemingly damaged anti-reflective coating, revealing that the blemishes can be relatively minor or extend across the entire display in extreme cases.

The anti-reflective coating issues do not appear to affect any MacBook Pro models released in 2016 or later.

Related Roundup: MacBook Pro
Buyer's Guide: MacBook Pro (Neutral)

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Apple Says 2011 MacBook Pro No Longer Eligible For ‘Video Issues’ Repair Program

Apple says the following models are no longer eligible for its MacBook Pro Repair Extension Program for Video Issues:

• 15-inch, Early 2011
• 15-inch, Late 2011
• 17-inch, Early 2011
• 17-inch, Late 2011

The following MacBook Pro models remain eligible, so long as they were purchased less than four years ago:

• Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2012
• Retina, 15 inch, Early 2013

Apple launched the repair program in February 2015 to address a "small percentage" of MacBook Pro models that "may exhibit distorted video, no video, or unexpected system restarts," allegedly due to faulty GPUs.

The program expired on December 31, 2016, but it's still in effect for eligible models up to four years from their original date of sale.

A support document on Apple's website says the affected models were sold between February 2011 and December 2013. Use the "Check Your Coverage" tool on Apple's website to determine if a particular model is eligible.

The video issues impacted many customers, prompting a class-action lawsuit against Apple and an online petition with over 40,000 signatures. Affected users often experience visual banding or malfunctions on the screen, particularly when watching HD videos or using pro apps such as Final Cut Pro X.

Apple will continue to repair Mid 2012 or Early 2013 models, free of charge. Affected customers can call an Apple Store to schedule a Genius Bar appointment, visit an Apple Authorized Service Provider, or call Apple Support and request a postage paid box to mail in the MacBook Pro to a local Apple Repair Center.

Related Roundup: MacBook Pro
Tags: repair program, Apple Support
Buyer's Guide: MacBook Pro (Neutral)

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Apple Extended its MacBook Pro Anti-Reflective Coating Repair Program

If you purchased a 12-inch MacBook or MacBook Pro with Retina display and have experienced issues with the anti-reflective coating wearing off or delaminating, Apple will repair the notebook free of charge.


Apple will replace Retina displays on eligible models purchased as far back as June 2012 until October 16, 2017, or within three years of the original date of purchase, whichever is longer. The program was extended to provide affected customers with a longer window of time to get their notebook serviced.

The program has not been publicly announced, but Apple confirmed to MacRumors that repairs continue to be handled internally through AppleCare. Apple does not plan to announce the program publicly at this time, unlike its iPhone 6s battery replacement program and over a dozen others listed on its website.

We recommend affected customers schedule a Genius Bar appointment at an Apple Store or contact Apple support by phone, online chat, or email. Click on "get help" on this page, and then select Mac > Mac notebooks > Hardware Issues > Display Issue and support options should be presented to you.

Apple's support website will ask for your Mac's serial number, which can be found by clicking on the Apple logo in the top-left corner of the screen and clicking on About This Mac in the dropdown menu.

Affected customers can also visit an Apple Authorized Service Provider to determine if their notebook is eligible for coverage. If you have already incurred out-of-warranty costs related to this issue, you may be eligible for a refund, which can be initiated by contacting Apple support directly.

MacRumors revealed the repair program's existence in October 2015 following over two years of online complaints from thousands of customers within our discussion forums, on the Apple Support Communities, and elsewhere.

A website called Staingate contains a gallery of MacBook Pro models with seemingly damaged anti-reflective coating, revealing that the blemishes can extend across the entire screen in extreme cases. Meanwhile, a Facebook group related to the issue has nearly 9,000 members and continues to see regular activity.


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Apple Officially Ends iPod Nano Replacement Program, but Still Honoring Requests

Apple recently removed its first-generation iPod nano replacement program from its support website, over five years after it started.

ipod_nano_replacement_notice
MacRumors contacted a few Apple Authorized Service Providers that confirmed the program has indeed ended, and we were advised to contact Apple directly. Apple's support team initially informed us the program is no longer in place, but a senior AppleCare advisor honored the program after we escalated our request.

In other words, if you still have a twelve-year-old iPod nano, you may be in luck still, but it could take some persistence to reach the right person.

The replacement program was launched worldwide in November 2011 after Apple determined that, in very rare cases, the battery in the first-generation iPod nano may overheat and pose a safety risk. The manufacturing defect is limited to iPod nano models sold between September 2005 and December 2006.

Related Roundup: iPod nano
Tag: repair program
Buyer's Guide: iPod Nano (Don't Buy)

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Apple Offering Refunds to Customers Who Paid for iMac Hinge Repairs

Apple has internally announced it will issue a refund to customers who previously paid for an iMac display hinge replacement or repair, according to a recently updated service document obtained by MacRumors. These repairs could often cost upwards of $100, according to reports from affected users.

imac_hinge
Apple's service document acknowledges some 27-inch iMacs shipped between December 2012 and July 2014 may be affected by an issue with the display hinge, resulting in the screen no longer adjusting and continuously tilting forward. The issue appears to be limited to late 2012 and late 2013 models in particular.

The issue has been frequently reported by dozens of users on the Apple Support Communities, MacRumors discussion forums, and elsewhere on the web, with a number of iMac owners describing a similar experience in which the hinge makes an audible popping or cracking sound and then stops working.


Apple Support Communities user Mr Mo-Fo:
I was just sitting watching TV when there was a loud crack and my iMac screen suddenly tilted down - now the screen will not stay where it is tilted/positioned. I was not using the iMac at the time and it was not doing anything it just broke on its own. The Mac was only bought in February and has not been moved or tilted once it was in place.
MacRumors user Plazm:
My one month old 27" iMac (about a month old) at work seems to have developed a loose hinge so that the screen always tilts at its most downward. It still tilts up and down, but will always return to that position by itself.
Apple has since extended its related iMac hinge repair program to cover late 2012 and late 2013 iMacs for up to five years from the date of their original purchase, compared to an original three-year period. Apple will replace the hinge mechanism on affected iMacs at no charge, regardless of warranty coverage.

Unlike some of Apple's other Exchange and Repair Extension Programs listed on its website, the details of this program have not been made publicly available. Apple has instead sent internal communication to Apple Authorized Service Providers with information about repairs and refunds.

Apple recommends affected customers contact the company by phone or web to initiate the refund process. Customers who still have a broken hinge can book an appointment with the Genius Bar at an Apple Store or visit an Apple Authorized Service Provider to determine if their iMac is eligible for the repair program.

Related Roundup: iMac
Tag: repair program
Buyer's Guide: iMac (Don't Buy)

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