Apple Celebrates Pride During Parades in San Francisco, New York City, and Toronto

Apple this weekend participated in a few LGBTQ pride parades happening around the world, including those in San Francisco, New York City, and Toronto.

Apple CEO Tim Cook tweeted his support for the parades, wishing a happy pride, "to all our employees, their families and customers around the world!"



The company handed out t-shirts with a rainbow Apple logo to those marching in the parades, and in San Francisco there was a large #applepride structure where visitors were able to write their own messages regarding the celebrations.

Image via @Gabomambo

In previous years Apple has taken to the streets for the pride parade in San Francisco with similar pride t-shirts for employees, commemorative videos posted on YouTube, iTunes gift cards, and a custom rainbow Apple Watch Woven Nylon band. The Pride Edition Woven Nylon band launched to the public during WWDC earlier this month, and Apple this week confirmed a portion of its proceeds are going to help LGBTQ organizations like The Trevor Project and the HRC.

Apple has long voiced support for LGBTQ causes like same sex marriage, as well as having spoken out against some controversial laws that predominantly risked negatively affecting the lives of gay, lesbian, and transgender individuals. Before he publicly came out as gay in late 2014, Apple CEO Tim Cook fought for equality in speeches and op-eds. Under late CEO Steve Jobs, Apple also opposed many discriminatory laws, including 2008's Proposition 8 that sought to eliminate the right to same sex marriage in California.

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.


Discuss this article in our forums

Apple Adopts San Francisco Font for Apple.com Website

As of today, Apple has started changing the font on its Apple.com website to San Francisco, the typeface it debuted alongside the Apple Watch in 2015.

On Apple's homepage and other web pages on the site, the San Francisco font is being used in many places where text is displayed, replacing the previous Myriad font. Bolder and easier to read, San Francisco has been used on iOS devices and Macs since iOS 9 and OS X 10.11 were introduced in 2015.

applesanfrancisco
San Francisco is a condensed sans-serif that's similar to Helvetica. It was created specifically for small displays like the Apple Watch, with extra spacing between letters to increase legibility. It also works well on larger Retina displays because of its clean design.

sanfrancisco2
Apple's website with old font on left, new San Francisco font on right

San Francisco is the first font Apple has designed in-house in many years. In the 80s and 90s, Apple used several fonts that were created in-house, but the company largely stopped making its own fonts in the early 1990s.

Apple isn't yet using the San Francisco font for its entire website, but may continue the transition to the new font over the coming days.

(Thanks, Nick!)


Discuss this article in our forums

All of San Francisco tried to buy ‘Hamilton’ tickets and pretty much failed

Https%3a%2f%2fblueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com%2fuploads%2fcard%2fimage%2f308121%2fap_957657341266

Feed-twFeed-fb

Many people are pulling a Donald Trump and calling the hit Broadway musical Hamiltonrude.” They struggled online for hours Monday to get tickets to the play before it comes to San Francisco next year. They mostly failed.

In what was an advance online ticketing event exclusively for American Express cardholders, tens of thousands lined up in an online “queue” at 10 a.m. Monday for tickets for the show that will be touring San Francisco beginning in March through August. 

But via a randomized number system assigned to hungry theatergoers, a huge number of people didn’t even get close to spending all their money on the hot musical.  Read more…

More about San Francisco, Musicals, Tickets, Hamilton, and Watercooler

Bay Area Apple Stores Experience String of Robberies

A robbery at an Apple Store in Palo Alto over the weekend has continued a string of Apple Store-related burglaries plaguing the Bay Area over the past few weeks. In Palo Alto, the University Avenue Apple Store was targeted by between eight and ten individuals who drove a rented SUV directly into the store's floor-to-ceiling glass front, and made away with an unspecified amount of iPhones, iPads, "and other gadgets on display."

The SUV used to crash into the Apple Store was subsequently disabled due to the purposeful wreck, and the thieves had to escape on foot. Since the event, which occurred early Sunday morning, four suspects have been arrested.

apple-store-robbery
Image via The Mercury News
“This was a pretty brazen act,” said Palo Alto police Sgt. James Reifschneider said, “when somebody breaks their way into a business after hours and uses a vehicle to force their way into a store.”
Elsewhere in and around San Francisco, since October there have been three Apple Store thefts within San Francisco itself, three in Berkeley, three in Burlingame, one in Los Gatos, and one in Corte Madera. These eleven crimes are all believed to be linked, with similar descriptions of the perpetrators connecting each robbery: "a group of young men in their late teens or early 20s wearing hooded sweatshirts."

The hooded thieves were said to rush into each Apple Store and "in about 45 seconds" stole upwards of $20,000 worth of iPhones and iPads tethered to their display tables. The Apple Store on Chestnut Street in San Francisco was hit on Black Friday and again the following Tuesday, at nearly the same time the Apple Store on Stockton Street was robbed. The frequency and "brazenness" of each robbery has lead to increased security in front of most Apple Stores in each area.
"It just keeps happening," said Burlingame resident Angelina Bruno. "It's really strange to feel that unsafe in a town that used to feel so safe."
The Palo Alto theft is not connected with these other crimes, according to local police. Local news channel KTVU reached out to Apple for a comment, but Apple spokesperson Nick Leahy said "we don't comment on matters of security."

It should be mentioned that in any Apple Store robbery, all of the devices that make it out of the store's Wi-Fi range become useless thanks to Apple's built-in security measure that bricks each smartphone and tablet.


Discuss this article in our forums

Michigan fined $10,000 for Jim Harbaugh’s postgame rant

Https%3a%2f%2fblueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com%2fuploads%2fcard%2fimage%2f299412%2f8b36c75f9a50474ba356fbe0ed15a090

Feed-twFeed-fb

Ohio State eked out a victory against Michigan last weekend, and a handful of close officiating calls left Michigan head coach Jim Harbaugh furious after the game.

Harbaugh was “bitterly disappointed” with the officiating, he said at the post-game press conference, and labeled some of the calls “outrageous.”

The Big Ten responded on Monday by reprimanding Harbaugh and fining Michigan $10,000. 

According to the Big Ten, Harbaugh violated the conference’s sportsmanship policy, which expects members of its institutions not to compromise “integrity of competition, civility toward all, and respect, particularly toward opponents and officials.” Read more…

More about Michigan, San Francisco, Nfl, Ncaa, and Football

San Francisco’s Muni transit system hacked, resulting in free rides for all

Https%3a%2f%2fblueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com%2fuploads%2fcard%2fimage%2f298042%2ftixmach

Feed-twFeed-fb

The nightmare hacking scenario many have feared has finally happened near the heart of Silicon Valley: a major rapid transit system has been hacked. 

San Francisco’s Municipal Transportation System, known locally as Muni, was hacked on Friday, with hackers leaving the message ‘You Hacked, ALL Data Encrypted,’ on Muni computer screens around the city on Saturday, according to the San Francisco Examiner.

The message from the hackers also included a contact email address that Muni officials could supposedly “contact for [the encryption] key.” The hacking incident was confirmed by a Muni worker who spoke to the paper, however, the man declined to give his name for fear of “workplace retaliation.” Read more…

More about Muni, San Francisco, Hacking, Hackers, and Tech