7 practical gifts for people who always break their phones

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Most of today’s flagship smartphones can be described as beautiful, but fragile. Materials like glass and metal also make smartphones more prone to slipping out of our hands than the plastic models of previous generations. Not to mention big phablets are nearly impossible to use with one hand, making them even more likely to accidentally take a tumble.

Nobody likes a cracked a screen, a dented bezel, a destroyed charging port or a crushed headphone jack. And nobody likes paying to have their broken phones replaced.

Whether you’re shopping for a clumsy friend or family member (heck, or maybe yourself), here are seven practical gifts for the person’s who’s always breaking their phone. Read more…

More about Otterbox, Applecare, Smartphones, Android, and Iphone

Aboriginal communities embrace technology, but have unique cyber safety challenges

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For many people living in remote Aboriginal communities, mobile devices are the sole means of accessing the internet. 

However, when the use of mobile devices oversteps social and cultural lines, it can have serious consequences for individuals and their families.

While some people avoid social media and online financial transactions as a protective measure, this can result in new forms of digital exclusion.

Our research into online risks, carried out in central Australia and Cape York, reveals unique problems in remote communities, many of which are caused by the sharing of devices.

More about Technology, Indigenous, Smartphones, Cyber Security, and The Conversation

Hands-on with the LyfieEye, a tiny affordable 360-degree camera for smartphones

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YouTube and Facebook‘s support for 360-degree photos and video has sparked mainstream consumer interest in broadcasting your life in this format.

But most 360-degree cameras on the market require a little bit of tech knowhow, whether it’s pairing with your phone successfully, or figuring out how to get the media onto the internet.

The LyfieEye is a new, tiny plug-in camera from Santa Clara startup eCapture, that promises to lower the barrier as far as possible.

For one, it plugs straight into your phone. This means no batteries to charge, and no finicky Bluetooth pairing. Read more…

More about Panorama, Cameras, Smartphones, 360 Degree Video, and Lyfieeye