How young Native Americans built and sustained the #NoDAPL movement

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Tokata Iron Eyes is beaming. Surrounded by journalists, camera crews and activists, the 13-year-old water protector—what she and other demonstrators call themselves—stands in the snow at a camp near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota, wearing a heavy gray coat, a large knitted scarf and thick burgundy mittens.

Just minutes earlier, she and the rest of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe learned that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers won’t grant an easement that would have allowed construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) to cross under Lake Oahe on the Missouri River. For months, Native American activists and allies have argued that the 1,172-mile, $3.8 billion pipeline project would pollute the region’s water supplies and desecrate sacred sites. Read more…

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Amnesty condemns ‘excessive’ violence at Standing Rock, calls for Obama to act

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Days after local authorities were condemned for spraying people with water cannons in freezing temperatures, Amnesty International has called for an end to America’s “over-militarized” response to the Standing Rock protest in North Dakota.

On Saturday, the organisation demanded President Obama halt the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. 

It also condemned the “excessive” force used on those seeking to end the nearly 1,200-mile oil pipeline’s advance under the Missouri River — the chief water source for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.

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The list of musicians supporting #NoDAPL reads like a festival lineup

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An array of more than 120 musicians are voicing their support for the Dakota Access Pipeline protesters.

British rock star Kate Nash is leading the effort to support the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, environmentalists and other protesters who have been at the center of a dispute over an area slated to be used in the Dakota Access Pipeline.

She’s recruited more than 100 big-name musicians, including members of Green Day, Radiohead, Pink Floyd, Death Cab for Cutie, Guns & Roses and Icona Pop, to sign a letter reiterating requests to remove pipeline construction and review the environmental impact of the project. Read more…

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Drone footage shows recent clashes at #NoDAPL protest in Standing Rock

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New drone footage shot over the Thanksgiving holiday shows the continued clashes between protesters and police at Standing Rock.

Protesters comprised of Native Americans, environmentalists and their supporters have set up camp for the past few months in an effort to shut down the construction of a Dakota Access oil pipeline near Standing Rock Sioux Tribe lands.

There have been several incidents of fairly violent confrontation between protesters and law enforcement officials, and allegations of police brutality continue to spread.

Drones have become a way to document the protest, deemed #NoDAPL. Read more…

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