Apple CEO Tim Cook ‘Thrilled’ With Launch Day Response to iPhone 8

As he often does on product launch days, Apple CEO Tim Cook this morning stopped by the Apple Store in Palo Alto, California as customers gathered to purchase an iPhone 8, Apple Watch Series 3, or 4K Apple TV.

Cook had a few minutes to speak with CNBC, and he said that he's "thrilled" with what he's seeing on launch day. Some stores have sold out of the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus he says, and many locations are out of the LTE Apple Watch Series 3 models.

Image via CNBC
"Here's what we're seeing right now. The watch with LTE -- the Series 3 Watch -- we are sold out in so many places around the world. And we're working really hard to meet demand. We've sold out of iPhone 8 and 8 Plus in some stores, but we've got good supply there. You can see what's going on here this morning -- I couldn't be happier."
Cook spent time mingling with friends and joining in on the staff tradition of cheering and waving to customers purchasing a new iPhone. "We really like what we're seeing," Cook said.

Cook also commented on the LTE issues plaguing the new Apple Watch, which have caused some major publications not to recommend the device for purchase.
"The issue is very minor, it will be fixed in a software update," Cook told CNBC. "It has to do with the handoff between Wi-Fi and cellular, and we'll fix that. It only happens in a rare number of cases. I've been using it for quite a while and it works great. So we're very happy about it."
The bug surfaced when reviewers got their hands on the Apple Watch Series 3 and noticed that it often wouldn't connect to LTE. It turns out, the watch is mistakenly joining unauthenticated Wi-Fi networks with interstitial agreement pages that can't be bypassed. Apple has said the bug will be fixed in an update, but has not given a timeline for the fix.

Despite Cook's positivity, some reports from around the world have suggested demand for the iPhone 8 is low. Reuters reported a "bleak turnout" in Australia and later said there was a "muted launch" in Asia.

The iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus are in stock and available for launch day purchase in many stores around the world.

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Tim Cook Speaks About DACA, Coding, and More at Bloomberg’s First ‘Global Business Forum’

Apple CEO Tim Cook attended Bloomberg's Global Business Forum today alongside former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg. He discussed several topics, ranging from DACA and human rights to education and the environment.

Tim Cook at Steve Jobs Theater

Cook said "dreamers," or individuals who were brought to the United States at a young age when their parents or guardians illegally immigrated to the country," only know the United States as home and deeply love the country.

He added that "we all started somewhere" and "we are all descendants of immigrants."


DACA, which the Trump administration moved to end earlier this month, allowed many illegal immigrants who entered the United States at age 16 or under to receive a renewable two-year period of deferred action from deportation, and eligibility for a work permit in the country.

Trump gave U.S. Congress a six-month window to try to "fix" and legalize the Obama-era policy before phasing it out. Nearly 800,000 undocumented individuals belong to the program, including over 250 Apple employees.

In a letter to employees, Cook said Apple will advocate for a legislative solution that provides permanent protections for all "dreamers" in the United States. He also said Apple would "provide them and their families the support they need, including the advice of immigration experts."

Cook added that "all companies should have values," since they are nothing more than "a collection of people."

As for education, Cook said Apple has been pushing for students to learn coding at all levels, ranging from K-12 schools to community colleges:
We started many years ago crafting a language that would be as easy to learn as Apple products are to use. We then designed a curriculum. We found an incredible number of K-12 institutions wanting and pulling the curriculum. We then took that to community colleges. […] These are huge systems with hundreds of thousands of people in them. I’m seeing an incredible desire to bring coding to the masses.

We're actually training teachers right now, and through every classroom we've been in, we’ve found willing teachers, administrators, and the kids are more engaged than ever before. Kids want to learn about the digital economy—they're growing up digital. It's not good for them to grow up digital, and then go to school in an analog world.
Apple's App Development with Swift is being offered at more than 30 community college systems across the United States this school year.

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

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Tim Cook Calls Today’s Launch of iOS 11 and ARKit ‘A Day To Remember’

Apple CEO Tim Cook appeared on Good Morning America earlier today to discuss topics surrounding iOS 11, taking place a few hours ahead of the software update's launch later this afternoon. One of the major topics of the conversation Cook had with Robin Roberts centered upon augmented reality and ARKit, which will introduce advanced AR features onto compatible iPhones and iPads.

As he has in the past, Cook talked excitedly about augmented reality, explaining that the AR features of iOS 11 are a "huge" addition to the iPhone and iPad ecosystem and will be "unbelievable" for users.

"Well this is huge because it's the first time that hundreds of millions of customers will be able to use AR for the first time. So we're bringing it to mainstream, if you've got an iPhone 6s or later, you have augmented reality today."
Roberts then pointed out that AR has been around for a long time before Apple began to work on the technology, and Cook responded by explaining that the company is "taking the complex and making it simple," with the help of the ARKit developer framework.

Cook capped off the discussion of iOS 11 and ARKit by calling today "a day to remember."
"This is what Apple is so fantastic at. We want everybody to be able to use AR, and so we've taken the complexity that developers would normally have to do in their apps, and made it simple for them to convert all of their apps to an AR experience. And the thing that is very different about Apple is that, in one day, we can make AR available for hundreds of millions of people. That will happen in a few hours from now.

The interview then shifted to the iPhone X and facial recognition, where Cook reiterated that user privacy and security are not an issue with the upcoming smartphone. "Once you place your face in the phone, it's in the phone, and Apple doesn't have it," he explained, further pointing out that only those you allow access to your iPhone will be able to get the data.
"We're very protective of our customers' data. We believe that privacy is very important in this world, there are hackers everywhere trying to steal your information. We want it to be yours, it is not ours."
In response to a viewer question, Cook said the cost of the iPhone X is a "value price" for the technology inside of the smartphone. He also said that "very few people" will actually pay the full price of the iPhone at launch, thanks to monthly payment plans that various carriers and Apple itself offers.

Other topics include Cook's response to the potential end of the DACA program, as well as different user questions surrounding Face ID. You can watch the full nine-minute interview on Good Morning America's Facebook page right here.

Related Roundup: iOS 11
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Tim Cook Says Apple Products ‘Change the World’ and Aren’t Priced Just ‘For the Rich’

Apple has ranked third on Fortune's annual list of companies that "change the world" based on the social impact of their core businesses, and CEO Tim Cook sat down for a related interview with executive editor Adam Lashinsky.


Cook agreed that Apple has changed the world, primarily through its products, which simply enable people to accomplish more.
I think the No. 1 way Apple changes the world is through our products. We make products for people that are tools to enable them to do things that they couldn’t otherwise do—to enable them to create or learn or teach or play. Or do something really wonderful.
He added that Apple has also changed the world through environmentalism, education, and advocacy for human rights, privacy, and philanthropy.

When asked why Apple doesn't run a charitable foundation, Cook said having a "separate thing" with a separate board of directors "wouldn't be Apple."
My view, we do a lot more good with a 120,000 people behind it than we would putting 12 people over in a corner to make decisions. I’m not criticizing people that do that. I think maybe they found a way and maybe it’s great. But it wouldn’t be Apple.
Cook mentioned Apple's free Swift Playgrounds curriculum as an example of how its products enable people to learn and create.
… And the whole concept of Swift is you make a coding language that has the ease of use of our products. And so everybody can learn it. Yet, it's powerful enough to write the most complex apps that you'd ever want to dream up. And then we thought, well, what else can we do, and so we came out with Swift Playgrounds, a curriculum for say K4, K5, sort of in that age range. And that began to take off. And so then we took a step back and we made a bigger program for all of K–12 called “Everyone Can Code."
Those people who learn to code may eventually become developers. Cook reiterated that the App Store economy supports millions of jobs.

Cook later disagreed with Lashinsky's opinion that Apple's business strategy is to "make premium-priced, high-margin, high-end products."
Well it's not high margin. I wouldn't use that word. There's a lot of companies that have much higher margins. We price for the value of our products. And we try to make the very best products. And that means we don't make commodity kind of products. And we don't disparage people that do; it's a fine business model. But it's not the business that we're in.

But if you look across our product lines, you can buy an iPad today for under $300. You can buy an iPhone, depending upon which one you select, for in that same kind of ballpark. And so these are not for the rich. We obviously wouldn't have over a billion products that are in our active installed base if we were making them for the rich because that's a sizable number no matter who's looking at the numbers.
Cook also hinted that Apple has "much more" to accomplish in the health-related area, and hinted at future products or services to come.
There's much more in the health area. There's a lot of stuff that I can't tell you about that we’re working on, some of which it's clear there's a commercial business there. And some of it it's clear there’s not. And some of it it's not clear. I do think it's a big area for Apple's future.
Full Interview: Tim Cook on How Apple Champions the Environment, Education, and Health Care via Fortune

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Tim Cook Says 250 Apple Employees Are ‘Dreamers’ as Donald Trump’s Decision on DACA Nears

Apple CEO Tim Cook on Sunday tweeted that Apple employs 250 so-called "dreamers," or individuals who were brought to the United States at a young age when their parents or guardians illegally immigrated to the country.

Image: Nicholas Kamm/Associated Free Press/Getty Images

"I stand with them," said Cook. "They deserve our respect as equals and a solution rooted in American values."


Cook's tweet comes shortly before U.S. President Donald Trump is expected to announce whether he will end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) immigration program as he promised.

Last week, Cook and around 300 other business leaders signed an open letter urging Trump to preserve the program, and to pass the bipartisan DREAM Act or similar legislation as a permanent solution.

DACA allows many illegal immigrants, who entered the United States at age 16 or under, to receive a renewable two-year period of deferred action from deportation and eligibility for a work permit in the country.

The program was created by way of an executive order signed by former President Barack Obama in 2012.

Trump vowed to end DACA during his presidential campaign, but he later admitted it would be a tough decision. Trump said young individuals enrolled in the program will be treated with "great heart."

If the program is ended, nearly 800,000 undocumented young individuals that fall under its protections would have the right to work legally until their two-year work permits expire, according to the Immigrant Legal Resource Center.

"Employment Authorization Documents (EADs), also known as work permits, are generally valid until they expire or the government demands they be returned," it said in an advisory posted to its website last week.

It's unclear if U.S. immigration authorities would then target those individuals for deportation, but it's certainly the feared outcome among those protected. Trump's decision is expected to be announced by Tuesday.

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.


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Apple CEO Tim Cook and Other Leaders Sign Letter Asking Trump to Protect DACA Program

Hundreds of chief executive officers, chief operating officers, chairmen, presidents, and other business leaders have added their signatures to an open letter asking President Trump to preserve the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

The program protects young adults brought illegally into the U.S. -- called "Dreamers" -- and grants them the "basic opportunity to work and study without the threat of deportation," through the opportunity of gaining legal work permits (via Recode).


Signatories include Apple CEO Tim Cook, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, Netflix CEO Reed Hastings, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Google CEO Sundar Pichai, Emerson Collective President Laurene Powell Jobs, and many more.

Trump is expected to announce a policy change today in regards to DACA, where it's believed that under the new policy the government will cease granting work permits to new Dreamers entering the U.S. Current Dreamers will reportedly be able to stay in the country until their permits run out, but would then find themselves unable to renew their work authorizations.

That would allow the nearly 800,000 individuals currently protected under DACA to remain in the U.S. for around two years, but the new letter implores Trump and the U.S. government to preserve DACA entirely.
Unless we act now to preserve the DACA program, all 780,000 hardworking young people will lose their ability to work legally in this country, and every one of them will be at immediate risk of deportation. Our economy would lose $460.3 billion from the national GDP and $24.6 billion in Social Security and Medicare tax contributions.
Dreamers are vital to the future of our companies and our economy. With them, we grow and create jobs. They are part of why we will continue to have a global competitive advantage.
Immigration and work-visa programs have been a hot topic between technology companies and the new Trump administration throughout 2017. The new letter ends with a call on Congress to pass legislation that "provides these young people raised in our country the permanent solution they deserve." You can read the full letter right here.

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.


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Apple CEO Tim Cook: ‘We Have a Moral Responsibility to Help Grow the Economy’

Tim Cook last Friday visited Austin, Texas, where he announced that Apple's App Development with Swift curriculum will be offered in over 30 leading community college systems across the United States starting in 2017.

During his visit to Austin, Cook sat down with The New York Times for a breakfast interview where he discussed topics ranging from job creation and diversity to the company's efforts to introduce coding curriculum in schools and colleges.

Image via The New York Times

On the topic of creating jobs, Cook said that he believes Apple has a "moral responsibility to help grow the economy" and to contribute both to the United States and to the other countries where Apple does business. That's why the company has worked so hard to introduce initiatives like Swift Playgrounds and coding in schools, in addition to making other investments like the recently announced data center coming to Iowa.

Cook also said he believes that the government has become less functional over time and that businesses have a responsibility to "step up" in areas like job creation.
"The reality is that government, for a long period of time, has for whatever set of reasons become less functional and isn't working at the speed that it once was. And so it does fall, I think, not just on business but on all other areas of society to step up."
Apple is focusing heavily on jobs related to apps and coding because it's an area where the company has already created a thriving job economy. Apple says 150,000 new jobs were created through the App Store last year, with $5 billion paid out to developers. The focus is on community colleges because Cook says "the community college system is much more diverse than four-year schools."

He went on to say that Apple is aiming to increase the racial, gender, and geographic diversity of people who are learning to code. "Right now, the benefits of tech are too lopsided to certain states," he said.

During the interview, Cook also commented on Apple's environmental efforts. Apple's upcoming data center in Iowa will run fully on renewable energy, as do all of the company's other U.S. facilities. "We're running Apple a hundred percent on renewable energy today," he said.

Cook's full interview, which covers his thoughts on running for president ("I already have a job"), his coding skills, developers creating Android apps, and more can be read over at The New York Times.

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

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Apple CEO Tim Cook Sells Over $43M in Apple Stock

Apple CEO Tim Cook today sold more than $43 million worth of Apple stock, according to documents filed with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission.

Cook sold 268,623 shares at prices ranging from $159.27 to $161.43, earning more than $43 million, all of which is held in a trust. Cook's stock was sold as part of a pre-arranged Rule 10b5-1 Plan set up in May of 2017, according to the SEC.

Cook sold the stock after 560,000 RSUs vested on August 24, 2017. 280,000 of the restricted stock units he received were time based, while another 280,000 were performance based.

A restricted stock unit (aka RSU) is compensation valued in terms of a company's stock, but the stock is not issued at the time of the grant. Instead, the recipient receives the stock at a later date, a method generally used to make sure employees stay with a company for a set period of time.

While Cook was originally set to receive 1,000,000 RSUs awarded over a 10-year period in two lump sums (the 1,000,000 share number was prior to Apple's 2014 7-1 stock split -- it's now 7,000,000), a 2013 amendment modified how his stock is awarded, shifting it from a time-based system to a performance-based system with the RSUs doled out over a 10-year period from 2011 to 2021.

Cook received one lump sum of 700,000 RSUs in 2016, and will receive another 700,000 in 2021. The remaining 5,600,000 RSUs are awarded based on Apple's performance compared to other companies in the S&P 500.

If Apple's total shareholder return is within the top third of the best performing companies in the S&P 500, Cook receives all 560,000 RSUs in a given year. If the company's performance is in the middle third, Cook's award is reduced by 25 percent, and if Apple happens to fall in the bottom third, Cook's award is reduced by 50 percent.

As Apple performed well this year, Cook received all 560,000 shares in 2017. In addition to the stock Cook sold, Apple also sold 291,377 shares worth $46 million on Cook's behalf to settle his tax liability for the RSUs.

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Apple CEO Tim Cook Visits Capital Factory Tech Incubator in Austin

Apple CEO Tim Cook has arrived in Austin, Texas, the latest destination on his mini trip around the United States the week.

Photo: Capital Factory

Cook started his day by visiting the Capital Factory tech accelerator and incubator in downtown Austin, where he met with local developers and entrepreneurs like Joah Spearman, the co-founder of local travel recommendation app Localeur, and Whitney Wolfe, the founder of popular dating app Bumble.

Cook also announced that Austin Community College District will be one of more than 30 community college systems across the United States to adopt Apple's "App Development with Swift" curriculum in the 2017-2018 school year.

Photo: Alyssa Vidales‏/Austin American-Statesman

Austin mayor Steve Adler was in attendance, and Cook complimented him for his leadership and for having the same values as Apple about diversity, the environment, development, and many other areas.

Cook visited the Cincinnati, Ohio and Waukee, Iowa areas yesterday, and it's possible he may have a few more visits or announcements planned in Austin before heading back to Apple headquarters in California later today.

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Apple’s ‘App Development with Swift’ Curriculum Expanding to Dozens of Community Colleges

Apple today announced that its App Development with Swift curriculum will now be offered in more than 30 leading community college systems across the United States in the 2017-2018 school year.


The full-year course, available for free on the iBooks store, teaches students how to build apps using Apple's open source programming language Swift. Apple says the course takes students with no programming experience and enables them to build fully-functional apps of their own design.
“We’ve seen firsthand how Apple’s app ecosystem has transformed the global economy, creating entire new industries and supporting millions of jobs,” said Tim Cook, Apple’s CEO. “We believe passionately that same opportunity should be extended to everyone, and community colleges have a powerful reach into communities where education becomes the great equalizer.”
The community college systems adopting the App Development with Swift curriculum in the fall include Austin Community College District, Northeast Mississippi Community College, Northwest Kansas Technical College, and additional campuses in the Alabama Community College System.
“We’re thrilled to have Apple join our mission to make Austin more affordable for people who already live in the city,” said Austin Mayor Steve Adler. “Apple is going to be a force multiplier in the community’s ongoing efforts to lift 10,000 out of poverty and into good jobs over the next five years.”
Austin town mayor Steve Adler said Apple CEO Tim Cook is in Austin today. While there, it's possible Cook may have other announcements on his agenda.


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