Apple CEO Tim Cook Says Financing iPhone X Can Work Out to Cost of Just a Few Nice Coffees Per Week

While the iPhone X starts at $999 in the United States, with an even more expensive 256GB model available for $1,149, Apple CEO Tim Cook believes the price can ultimately work out to less than one cup of coffee per day.


On a conference call after Apple reported its fourth quarter earnings results on Thursday, Cook started by saying the iPhone X can be financed for as little as $33 per month at select carriers in the United States.

AT&T, for example, offers the base model iPhone X for 30 monthly payments of $33.34, which works out to exactly $1,000 over that period.

"I think it's important to remember that a large number of people pay for the phone by month," said Cook. "I think you would find you could buy an iPhone X for $33/month. So, if you think about that, that's a few coffees a week -- it's less than a coffee a day at one of these nice coffee places."

Cook added that many customers are now trading in their current iPhone towards their next iPhone, reducing their total amount owing by $300 to $350 in the process. He said the iPhone tends to have the highest resale value in the industry.

"In terms of the way we price, we price to the value that we're providing," said Cook. "We're not trying to charge the highest price we could get or anything like that. We're just trying to price it for what we're delivering. iPhone X has a lot of great new technologies in there that are leading the industry."

"It is a fabulous product," he added, still referring to the iPhone X. "We can't wait for people to start getting it in their hands."

Related Roundup: iPhone X
Buyer's Guide: iPhone X (Buy Now)

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Apple CEO Tim Cook Says Financing iPhone X Can Work Out to Cost of Just a Few Nice Coffees Per Week

While the iPhone X starts at $999 in the United States, with an even more expensive 256GB model available for $1,149, Apple CEO Tim Cook believes the price can ultimately work out to less than one cup of coffee per day.


On a conference call after Apple reported its fourth quarter earnings results on Thursday, Cook started by saying the iPhone X can be financed for as little as $33 per month at select carriers in the United States.

AT&T, for example, offers the base model iPhone X for 30 monthly payments of $33.34, which works out to exactly $1,000 over that period.

"I think it's important to remember that a large number of people pay for the phone by month," said Cook. "I think you would find you could buy an iPhone X for $33/month. So, if you think about that, that's a few coffees a week -- it's less than a coffee a day at one of these nice coffee places."

Cook added that many customers are now trading in their current iPhone towards their next iPhone, reducing their total amount owing by $300 to $350 in the process. He said the iPhone tends to have the highest resale value in the industry.

"In terms of the way we price, we price to the value that we're providing," said Cook. "We're not trying to charge the highest price we could get or anything like that. We're just trying to price it for what we're delivering. iPhone X has a lot of great new technologies in there that are leading the industry."

"It is a fabulous product," he added, still referring to the iPhone X. "We can't wait for people to start getting it in their hands."

Related Roundup: iPhone X
Buyer's Guide: iPhone X (Buy Now)

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Apple CEO Tim Cook Talks Russian Election Interference, Fake News and Tax Reform in Nightly News Interview

Apple CEO Tim Cook sat down with NBC's Lester Holt on tonight's NBC Nightly News broadcast, where he spoke about Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, the need for tax reform in the United States, and more.

As was shared in a clip of the interview earlier today, Cook commented on Russia's use of social media to interfere with the 2016 election and the congressional hearings executives from Facebook, Twitter, and Google have been attending to discuss the role Russia might have played. Cook said he believes the social networks in question have been learning "along the way a lot" and that fake news is a major issue.

I think they learned along the way a lot. And you know, it's best to ask them if they should have projected it or not. I don't believe that the big issue are ads from foreign government. I believe that's like .1 percent of the issue.

The bigger issue is that some of these tools are used to divide people, to manipulate people, to get fake news to people in broad numbers, and so, to influence their thinking. And this, to me, is the No. 1 through 10 issue.
Cook went on to say that we'll likely learn a lot more in the hearings in regard to the particulars of what went on, and he said companies have a responsibility to make sure technology is "good." "I do think that technology itself doesn't want to be good," he said. "It doesn't want to be anything. It's up to the creator of the technology and the user of the technology to make it good."

Cook also spoke on tax reform. Corporate tax rates, he says, "should have been fixed years ago." "Let's get it done now," he added.
I believe that tax reform is sorely needed in this country. We don't focus on the individual side, but for corporations, we think we have a pretty deep perspective on this. The biggest issue with corporations in this country is that if you earn money outside of the United States, which most companies increasingly will, the only way that you can bring it into the US and invest is if you pay 40 percent. And this is kind of a crazy thing to do. So what do people do? They don't bring it to the United States.
During the interview, which took place on Apple's campus, Cook showed Holt an iPhone X and explained Face ID features and security, topics Apple has covered multiple times in past executive interviews and through a detailed Face ID support document.


All Face ID data is stored on device, not on Apple's servers, Cook reiterated. "We don't have it intentionally because it's yours," he said. As he has done many times in the past, Cook also highlighted Apple's focus on privacy and said that if he had to re-do the legal controversy with the FBI over San Bernardino, he'd "make the same decision today."

On the topic of selling user data, Cook said that's not something Apple does.
It's something that we don't do because you are not our product. We take a very pro-privacy view. Apple doesn't know what the content of your messages are. We encrypt FaceTime end-to-end. We don't know what you're saying. And we think that's the way people would expect.
A final topic of discussion covered the evolution of the iPhone over the course of the last 10 years and whether it's reached where Steve Jobs had envisioned it would go.

"You know, we knew from the launch it was going to change the world. But frankly, it's gone far beyond what we would have dreamed," Cook said.

NBC Nightly News hasn't yet shared the full video of Cook's interview, but it should be available soon on the NBC website and will include his full commentary on a range of issues.

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.


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Apple CEO Tim Cook to Appear on NBC Nightly News Tonight

Apple CEO Tim Cook will appear in an interview with NBC's Lester Holt on this evening's NBC Nightly News broadcast, NBC unveiled in a tweet this afternoon.

One of the topics of discussion will include Russia's use of social media to interfere with the 2016 presidential election. In a teaser clip airing ahead of the interview, Cook says the use of social media to spread fake news and manipulate people is a major problem.

"I don't believe that the big issue are ads from foreign government. I believe that's like .1 percent of the issue," Cook told NBC Nightly News anchor Lester Holt in an exclusive interview airing Wednesday night.

"The bigger issue is that some of these tools are used to divide people, to manipulate people, to get fake news to people in broad numbers, and so, to influence their thinking," Cook said. "And this, to me, is the No. 1 through 10 issue."
Cook's commentary on Russia comes just after representatives from Facebook, Twitter, and Google testified before congress over what role Russian interference on social media networks may have played in the election. On Facebook alone, an estimated 126 million Americans viewed Russian-backed ad content during the campaign.

During the testimony, execs from the three social networks faced tough questions and were lambasted for not doing more to prevent Russia from taking advantage of social media to spread misinformation.

Another topic of conversation will include US tax reform, with Cook telling Holt that tax reform is sorely needed and "should have been fixed years ago."

NBC Nightly News premieres at 6:30 p.m. eastern time in the United States.

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.


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Tim Cook Visits China Where iPhone Sales Finally Rebounded Last Quarter After Lengthy Skid

Apple chief Tim Cook was among a group of leaders who met China's President Xi Jinping on Monday at an annual gathering of advisers to the Tsinghua University business school in the capital Beijing, according to Reuters.


Apple declined to comment on details of his visit. Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg, who also attended, stated that "every year this trip is a great way to keep up with the pace of innovation and entrepreneurship in China."

The meeting occurred just days before Apple launches its much-anticipated iPhone X in 55 countries, including China, with hopes the high-end smartphone can revive the company's sales in the world's second largest economy.

Apple shipped an estimated 11 million iPhones in China last quarter, up 40 percent from the year-ago quarter, according to research firm Canalys. The strong growth put an end to six consecutive quarters of declining iPhone sales in the region.


Canalys believes Apple's rebound, buoyed by the launch of the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus last month, could be short lived.
"Apple's growth this quarter is only temporary. The high sell-in caters to the pent-up demand of iPhone upgraders in the absence of the iPhone X. Price cuts on earlier models after announcing the iPhone 8 have also helped. However, Apple is unlikely to sustain this growth in Q4," said Canalys Research Analyst Mo Jia.

Despite being touted as widely expensive, excitement for the launch of the iPhone X is building in China. "While the iPhone X launches this week, its pricing structure and supply are inhibiting. The iPhone X will enjoy a healthy grey market status, but its popularity is unlikely to help Apple in the short term," added Jia.
iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus have quickly "run out of steam" in mainland China, despite being heavily discounted by online retailers such as Suning.com and JD.com, according to the South China Morning Post.
"The iPhone 8 might be the most poorly sold flagship iPhone model in China, as such huge discounts have never been seen before in the country," said Zhao Ziming, a senior analyst at Pintu Tank in Beijing.
While the iPhone X could help Apple in the fourth quarter, its high price and supply constraints might inhibit the company's growth in China in the short term, according to Canalys research analyst Mo Jia.

Apple was the fifth largest smartphone maker in China last quarter, behind local brands Huawei, Vivo, Oppo, and Xiaomi, according to Canalys.


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Tim Cook Travels to Sweden to Visit Local Apple Office and Discuss Augmented Reality [Updated]

After first traveling around France earlier in the week and meeting with French president Emmanuel Macron, then heading to Oxford University in the United Kingdom for the opening of The Oxford Foundry, Apple CEO Tim Cook has now traveled to Stockholm, Sweden today. Just after 9 a.m. local time, Cook was spotted getting out of a black, unmarked Mercedes in Stockholm.

Cook was on Kungsgatan, a street in central Stockholm where Apple's office is located within the city, and an eyewitness speaking to Breakit [Google Translate] said that the CEO traveled with "a whole entourage" into the building, then "rushed out" a few hours later. Cook is likely making the usual rounds to other Apple locations, including potentially checking on the progress of Apple's upcoming flagship store in Kungsträdgården, a park located near Apple's offices in the city.

Photos by TT and Jon Wahlqvist, via Breakit
"He had a whole entourage around as he walked across the street," says an eyewitness to Breakit. Tim Cook and his co-workers entered the gateway to Apple's Stockholm office. A few hours later, the Apple boss rushed out of the building again.

Breakit's reporter Jon Wahlqvist asks Tim Cook what he does in Stockholm. However, the Apple boss did not seem to be interested in addressing any such details: "The only thing he said was terrific, terrific, terrific and gave up his thumb. From the car he then waved in the nearest presidential style, "says Jon Wahlqvist.
Cook also stopped to discuss augmented reality with Feber [Google Translate], where he explained that the first few apps using ARKit are comparable to the opening of the App Store in 2008. Even though this first wave of apps might not wow everyone, Cook said that eventually iPhone users will not be able to "imagine a life without" augmented reality. Cook has made similar AR-related comments for years now, and just this week sat down with The Independent and Vogue to discuss the topic even more in-depth.
I do not think they need to understand, not directly. I would like to compare it with when we opened the App Store 2008. When the first apps came out, people were not so impressed. I remember people wrote things like "this is not so amazing" and "this will not be so important". Today, we can not imagine a life without mobile apps and we use them for everything.

I think we'll see a similar curve that we saw with the usual apps. After a first phase, the curve of use will point straight up. AR is fundamentally different to VR because AR can be a part of everything you do, every day.
The interview further discusses how AR can "enhance" human experiences and day-to-day life without replacing anything, as well as how the technology needs to coexist with Apple's initiatives in the artificial intelligence space. Cook also continued championing students learning to code: "I think everyone who goes to school should learn how to code, but I do not think everyone should be a computer engineer. I think the knowledge to know what's possible is the most important, whether you're a fashion designer or journalist or whatever it is."

Update: Tim Cook has also visited with Iggesund Paperboard, a manufacturer of high quality virgin fiber paperboard and Apple's partner in sustainable packaging.





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Apple CEO Tim Cook Talks to Students at Oxford University

Apple CEO Tim Cook today headed over to Oxford University for the opening of The Oxford Foundry, a new "innovation space" that's open to all University of Oxford students.

Cook was on hand to cut the ribbon at the new location, and afterwards, he sat down for a Q&A session with Oxford students alongside Oxford professors and administrators.


Because he was speaking to a group of students, Cook talked about his early life experiences, how he began to hunt for a job after leaving college, and his decision to join Apple. Early on, he said, his goal was to find a job that he loved. "I wanted to love the work I did," he said. "I no longer have that goal."
I realized the purpose of life wasn't to love your job, it was to serve humanity in a broad way. And the outcome of doing that would mean you love your job. I realized I wasn't in a place to do that, so sometime thereafter, I switched companies. [...]

It was only after joining Apple where my values and my work aligned, and that has made all the difference for me.
Cook says it wasn't an easy decision to join Apple. Everyone he talked to, his list of pluses and minuses, and his spreadsheets told him to stay where he was, but his intuition said something different, and he ended up going with intuitition. "That was one of the most important decisions of my life," he said. "Maybe the most important."

On designing products, Cook told students to "make products that you want to use" and the rest will follow.
You can bet if you love it, there are many other people out there that are going to love it too. That fundamental saying drives Apple.
Cook went on to explain that it's important to "stick close" to customers, listening to them and making yourself accessible to them. Cook said that's one of the reasons why Apple has retail stores, and it's also the reason why he gets up at "ungodly hours." "I like to spend my first hour going through customer emails," he said. "Because I want to know what they're saying. I want to know what they're feeling."

Cook said he takes inspiration from the artists, doctors, musicians, and others who use Apple products to change the world in some way. On failures, he says students just need to have faith that it will pass.
There will be times that you fail on a spectacular basis. I certainly have. You have to have the faith that it will pass. Look in the mirror and watch the person breathe. It didn't kill you. You're not dead. It's not the biggest thing in the world. It will pass. And I do that many times a day sometimes. Do that for a while and you won't have to remind yourself anymore. You'll be able to take these failures... and in fact, you'll view them not as failures but as things learned, and it won't be so detrimental.
Cook's interview, which can be watched above, also covered some of his thoughts on Steve Jobs, what he learned from working with Jobs, his view of augmented reality and the future, and his thoughts on who his heroes are.


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Tim Cook Thinks Retailers Will Find Augmented Reality as Key as Having a Website

Apple CEO Tim Cook believes there isn't any sector or industry that will be untouched by augmented reality going forward.

Tim Cook via Alastair Nicol for Vogue

In a recent interview with Vogue, Cook said he believes the technology will transform everything from fashion runway shows to shopping.
"If you think about a runway show in the fashion world, that's a great application of AR because some of these, you want to see the dress all the way around, you do not want to just see the front." That kind of experience is all the more important now that runway shows are catering to a wider consumer audience watching online, and not just those seated in the front rows, he added.
Apple's chief envisions a world where customers will essentially be able to "point and buy" products. If your friend is wearing a pair of shoes you like, for example, you could point your iPhone at them, and a shopping app could instantly bring up information about the pair with the option to purchase them online.
"We don't have a plan to collect all of these objects, but I know companies who are working on that for their products," Cook said. "If you think about companies that offer a fair number of shoes, and [if a customer] sees a shoe and goes I want that one, you just want to point and [buy]. That will be a part of the shopping experience of the future, it absolutely will."
Cook is so confident in augmented reality's future that he believes the technology will become "as key as having a website" for brands.


Some retailers have already implemented augmented reality features using Apple's new ARKit platform on iOS 11. IKEA, for example, has released an app called IKEA Place that lets you virtually place furniture in your home, with true-to-scale models of everything from sofas and armchairs to footstools and coffee tables.

Cook thinks the current selection of augmented reality apps is only the very beginning of what's to come in the years ahead.

In one early ARKit demo, for instance, a woman is able to virtually try on various shades of lipstick and quickly choose her preferred color.


Later in the video, the woman browses a virtual aisle of images of herself with various cosmetics digitally applied, making her selection a much simpler process than the traditional hassle of physical makeup application.


Cook also said that the technology needed for augmented reality glasses "doesn't exist to do that in a quality way," suggesting that widely rumored Apple Glasses won't be released "any time soon."
"There are rumours and gossip about companies working on that, and we obviously don't talk about what we work on. But today I can tell you that the technology itself doesn't exist to do that in a quality way," Cook said. "We don't give a rats about being first, we want to be best in creating people's experiences. Something that you would see out in the market any time soon would not be something that any of us would be satisfied with."
Cook's sit-down discussion appears to be the same one that The Independent covered earlier this week.

Full Interview: Apple's Tim Cook On The Future Of Fashion & Shopping


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Apple CEO Tim Cook and French President Macron Discussed Education and Taxes in Monday Meeting

Apple CEO Tim Cook today met with French President Emmanuel Macron at the Élysée Palace, and over the course of 45 minutes, the two discussed topics like education, the economy, and taxes in Europe, according to French news sites.

Apple would like to extend its "Everyone Can Code" educational initiative to France, and plans to discuss its expansion with the Ministry of National Education.


Introduced in 2016, Everyone Can Code is aimed at adding coding lessons into elementary schools and colleges. Hundreds of elementary schools have adopted Everyone Can Code material in the United States, and community colleges across the country have also begun offering App Development with Swift classes.

As rumored, Apple also plans to open an installation at Parisian startup incubator "Station F" in an effort to help French app developers create and launch iOS apps. Station F is the largest startup facility in the world and other companies like Facebook, Microsoft, and Ubisoft, already run startup programs at the incubator.

The two also discussed the relationship between Apple and French suppliers and how it can be improved, with Apple planning to work with additional French suppliers for future products.

Taxes in Europe were the last topic of discussion. Cook and Macron discussed the need for tech companies to contribute to the economy in the countries in which they operate. Led by Macron, France and Germany have called for an aggressive overhaul of how tech companies pay taxes across the European Union with the aim of introducing a more unified corporate tax system across Europe.

Cook and Macron are said to have had a constructive discussion on taxes, with no deadlock in the dialogue, but both agreed that a solution will ultimately be enacted by the European Union rather than France.

Cook had a busy day in France. In addition to meeting with Macron, he also visited iPhone X component supplier Eldim, the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial, "My Little Paris" recommendation startup, and "CoachGuitar," a company that makes an app for teaching people how to play the guitar.


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Tim Cook Visits iPhone X Supplier, Normandy Cemetery, and ‘My Little Paris’ Startup on French Trip [Updated]

Apple CEO Tim Cook is in Paris today ahead of a meeting with the French president Emmanuel Macron at 4:15 CEST. Before that meeting happens, Cook has a full itinerary for his day and the CEO has been documenting parts of his travels on Twitter.

Cook's first Tweet noted his visitation to Eldim, a company based in Normandy that specializes in creating advanced optical metrology tools. Eldim is a component supplier of the upcoming iPhone X, providing Apple with critical components of the iPhone X's Face ID biometric security system.



Specifically, Eldim is said to be responsible for the eye detection abilities of Face ID -- a crucial factor in Apple's new software, which can detect when a user's eyes are open (unlocking the iPhone X) or closed (keeping the smartphone locked). Eldim CEO Thierry Leroux called the collaboration with Apple "an incredible adventure." Leroux further stated that, "for us it was a bit like sending someone to the moon." Tim Cook was said to have responded with a congratulations and telling the company and its 42 employees, "it's great what you did for us!" (via Mac Generation and Ouest-France).

While in Normandy, Cook visited the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial, which honors the American lives that were lost in Europe during World War II.



Cook also made a surprise visit to a startup called "My Little Paris" where he shared a roast chicken with employees. My Little Paris specializes in recommending sites and attractions to see around the city. Originating as a weekly newsletter created by Fany Péchiodat and sent to her friends and family, the original idea has since evolved into a $42 million startup.



Next up should be Cook's meeting with Macron. The topics of discussion for this meeting are being kept secret, but the two men are largely expected to talk about the issue of corporate tax law in France. In August, France and Germany announced preparations to stop tech companies like Apple from exploiting tax loopholes in their respective countries, with Macron leading the crackdown on international tech companies in France.

Cook's visit to France in 2017 follows a troublesome period of months for Apple back in 2016, when the European Commission ruled that Apple received illegal state aid from Ireland and ordered the company to pay $14.5 billion in back taxes. Apple appealed the decision in December of 2016 by arguing the European Commission made "fundamental errors" in its ruling, but the Cupertino company has noted that it expects the case to continue for several years.

In the wake of these reports, Cook called the tax avoidance claims "total political crap," writing an open letter that stated Apple has become "the largest taxpayer in the world," and that the company "follows the law and we pay all the taxes we owe."

Update: Cook also visited the offices of "CoachGuitar," an app that teaches users how to play the guitar.



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