Apple’s Watch-Sized iPod Nano is Officially Obsolete

The sixth-generation iPod nano is officially obsolete, meaning Apple will no longer repair or service the portable media player.


Apple added the sixth-generation iPod nano to its internal vintage and obsolete products list on August 30, according to a memo distributed to Apple Stores and Apple Authorized Service Providers seen by MacRumors.

Apple repairs and services products for up to five years after they are no longer manufactured. The sixth-generation iPod nano was released in September 2010 and discontinued in September 2012.

As required by statute, sixth-generation iPod nano owners in California may still obtain service from Apple Stores or by contacting AppleCare at 1-800-APL-CARE. The extended coverage period will likely end in September 2019.

The sixth-generation iPod nano was notable for its square-shaped design. A number of third-party straps and accessories were released that essentially turned the device into an early, dumbed down version of the Apple Watch.


Unlike the fifth-generation iPod nano, the sixth-generation model lacked a click wheel, video camera, and speaker. Instead, it had a touchscreen and adopted the iPod shuffle's clip to make it wearable on the go.

Apple returned to a rectangular design for the seventh-generation iPod nano, and added a Home button to the device. The design remained the same until Apple discontinued the entire iPod nano and iPod shuffle lineups in July.

Apple has yet to list the sixth-generation iPod nano on its public vintage and obsolete products list, but the device will likely be added soon.


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Apple’s Last 17-inch MacBook Pro Set to Become Obsolete

Apple will soon make the Mid-2011 MacBook Air and Late 2011 MacBook Pro obsolete, meaning the two models will no longer be accepted for official repair in Apple Stores from June 30.

The computers are about to be added to Apple's vintage and obsolete products document, according to 9to5Mac, indicating that Apple has discontinued hardware support for both MacBooks in all regions except for California and Turkey.


Also set to be included in the obsolescence list is the Mid-2009 17-inch MacBook Pro, which is the last 17-inch computer Apple has made.

The company's large form factor laptops first made an appearance in 2003 with the launch of the 17-inch G4 Powerbook, which cost $3299 and featured a 1GHz processor, 512MB of RAM, and a 60GB hard drive. A 17-inch MacBook Pro formed part of Apple's notebook lineup between April 2006 and June 2012. The last major update to Apple's 17-inch Pro machine came in January 2009, when a unibody variant was unveiled.

Apart from the computers, the iPhone 3GS and the first generation 802.11n AirPort Express will also be added to the list, as part of Apple's routine practice of making legacy devices obsolete. The company ended support for the polycarbonate MacBook and mid-2009 MacBook Pro models earlier this month.


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Apple’s Last Plastic MacBook Now Considered Obsolete

Apple today updated its official list of vintage and obsolete products to add the 2010 13-inch MacBook, the final plastic-shelled MacBook it produced before discontinuing the line, and several 2009 MacBook Pro models.

Apple first introduced the unibody polycarbonate MacBook, the third design iteration of the MacBook line, in late 2009, offering it in black and white. The MacBook was sold for only a short time, having been discontinued in mid-2011 after the introduction of the MacBook Air.


The MacBook, along with the MacBook Pro models, have been added to Apple's list of Mac products that are considered "vintage" in the United States and Turkey and "obsolete" in the rest of the world. A full list of the Mac models that have been obsoleted is below:

- MacBook (13-inch, Mid 2010)
- MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2009)
- MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2.53GHz, Mid 2009)
- MacBook Pro (15-inch, Mid 2009)

Apple has also added all models of the iPhone 3G to the "iPhone products obsolete worldwide" list, but it also continues to be listed under "iPhone products vintage in the United States and obsolete in the rest of the world" so its official status is unclear.

Under Apple's classification system, vintage products are those that have not been manufactured for more than 5 years and less than 7 years ago, while obsolete products are those that are discontinued more than 7 years ago.

The vintage classification means that Apple is no longer offering hardware service for the devices except in Turkey and California, where local statutes require that Apple continue to provide service and parts for a longer period of time. The obsolete classification means Apple has discontinued all hardware service with no exceptions.

Apple retail stores, and the Canadian, European, Latin American, and Asia-Pacific operating regions follow Apple's United States product list, but do not distinguish between vintage and obsolete.


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Second-Generation Apple TV Added to Apple’s List of Obsolete Products

Apple today updated its official list of vintage and obsolete products to add the second-generation Apple TV, originally released in 2010.

The second-generation Apple TV was the first Apple TV that featured a black body and an aluminum Apple Remote, an updated look compared to the silver and white Apple TV that was originally released in 2007.

Apple sold the second-generation Apple TV from September of 2010 until 2012, which is when the company released the third-generation Apple TV with an A5 chip and support for 1080p content.

The second-generation Apple TV is now classified as "vintage" in the United States and Turkey and "obsolete" in the rest of the world. Vintage products are those that have not been manufactured for more than 5 and less than 7 years ago, while obsolete products are those that were discontinued more than 7 years ago.

Both classifications essentially mean Apple is no longer providing hardware service for the device except in Turkey and California, where local statutes require that Apple continue to provide service and parts for a longer period of time.

Related Roundups: Apple TV, tvOS 10
Tag: vintage and obsolete
Buyer's Guide: Apple TV (Don't Buy)

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Apple Adds Early 2011 13-Inch MacBook Pro to Obsolete Products List

early-2011-macbook-pro-13-inchEarlier this week, we reported on Apple's plans to add select 2009 to 2011 model Macs to its vintage and obsolete products list on December 31, including 15-inch and 17-inch MacBook Pro models from early 2011.

In the meantime, Apple today added the smaller 13-inch MacBook Pro from early 2011 to the list. The notebook is classified as "vintage" in California and Turkey, and "obsolete" in the rest of the United States and world.

The early 2011 13-inch MacBook Pro is no longer eligible for hardware service or new parts from Apple or Apple Authorized Service Providers, except in Turkey and California, where Apple will continue to provide repairs and documentation for up to two years, or roughly December 2018 in this case, as required by local statutes.

Meanwhile, the iMac (20-inch, Early 2009) and iMac (24-inch, Early 2009) are now considered fully obsolete worldwide. This means the pair of iMacs have lost their "vintage" status in California and Turkey, and are no longer eligible for hardware service or new parts from Apple or Apple Authorized Service Providers anywhere.

Vintage products are those that have not been manufactured by Apple for between five and seven years. Obsolete products are those that were discontinued by Apple more than seven years ago. Apple and Authorized Service Providers make no distinction between obsolete and vintage products outside of California and Turkey.


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Apple to Obsolete Select 2009 to 2011 Macs at End of Year

mac-mini-mbp-2009-to-2011Apple plans to add select 2009 to 2011 model Macs to its vintage and obsolete products list on December 31, 2016, according to an internal memo seen by MacRumors.

The following Macs will be classified as either vintage or obsolete in the United States, Canada, Japan, Europe, Latin America, and the Asia-Pacific region:

MacBook Pro (15-inch, Early 2011)
• MacBook Pro (17-inch, Early 2011)
Mac mini (Early 2009)
• MacBook (13-inch, Mid 2009)

The aforementioned Macs will no longer be eligible for hardware service or new parts from Apple or Apple Authorized Service Providers, except in Turkey and California, where Apple will continue to provide repairs and documentation for up to two years, or December 31, 2018 in this case, as required by local statutes.

Vintage products are those that have not been manufactured by Apple for between five and seven years. Obsolete products are those that were discontinued by Apple more than seven years ago. Apple and Authorized Service Providers make no distinction between obsolete and vintage products outside of Turkey and California.

Related Roundup: Mac mini
Tag: vintage and obsolete
Buyer's Guide: Mac Mini (Don't Buy)

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