Snapchat Spectacles Now Available to Purchase Across Europe

Snap made its Spectacles available across Europe today, almost seven months after the company debuted them in the U.S.

For anyone unfamiliar with Snapchat's first hardware product, the Spectacles are a one-size-fits-all pair of sunglasses that can record 10 seconds of video at a time and sync wirelessly with the mobile Snapchat app.


More than 55 million people use Snapchat daily in Europe for at least 30 minutes a day, according to Snap. It's unclear what sales number the company is targeting on the continent, given that the launch of the Spectacles in the U.S. didn't raise significant revenue, but today's rollout comes as part of a planned substantial investment in the product's marketing and distribution.

The camera-equipped sunglasses cost £130/150 euros and can be purchased from the product website or through "Snapbot" vending machines, which will appear on Friday in London, Paris, Barcelona, Berlin, and Venice. The vending machines dispense the Spectacles in either Black, Coral or Teal, and allow customers to try them on virtually using a built-in augmented reality display. A case and charging cable are included.


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Snapchat Spectacles Now Available to Purchase Across Europe

Snap made its Spectacles available across Europe today, almost seven months after the company debuted them in the U.S.

For anyone unfamiliar with Snapchat's first hardware product, the Spectacles are a one-size-fits-all pair of sunglasses that can record 10 seconds of video at a time and sync wirelessly with the mobile Snapchat app.


More than 55 million people use Snapchat daily in Europe for at least 30 minutes a day, according to Snap. It's unclear what sales number the company is targeting on the continent, given that the launch of the Spectacles in the U.S. didn't raise significant revenue, but today's rollout comes as part of a planned substantial investment in the product's marketing and distribution.

The camera-equipped sunglasses cost £130/150 euros and can be purchased from the product website or through "Snapbot" vending machines, which will appear on Friday in London, Paris, Barcelona, Berlin, and Venice. The vending machines dispense the Spectacles in either Black, Coral or Teal, and allow customers to try them on virtually using a built-in augmented reality display. A case and charging cable are included.


Discuss this article in our forums

Snapchat Spectacles Now Available to Purchase Across Europe

Snap made its Spectacles available across Europe today, almost seven months after the company debuted them in the U.S.

For anyone unfamiliar with Snapchat's first hardware product, the Spectacles are a one-size-fits-all pair of sunglasses that can record 10 seconds of video at a time and sync wirelessly with the mobile Snapchat app.


More than 55 million people use Snapchat daily in Europe for at least 30 minutes a day, according to Snap. It's unclear what sales number the company is targeting on the continent, given that the launch of the Spectacles in the U.S. didn't raise significant revenue, but today's rollout comes as part of a planned substantial investment in the product's marketing and distribution.

The camera-equipped sunglasses cost £130/150 euros and can be purchased from the product website or through "Snapbot" vending machines, which will appear on Friday in London, Paris, Barcelona, Berlin, and Venice. The vending machines dispense the Spectacles in either Black, Coral or Teal, and allow customers to try them on virtually using a built-in augmented reality display. A case and charging cable are included.


Discuss this article in our forums

Snapchat Spectacles Now Available to Purchase Across Europe

Snap made its Spectacles available across Europe today, almost seven months after the company debuted them in the U.S.

For anyone unfamiliar with Snapchat's first hardware product, the Spectacles are a one-size-fits-all pair of sunglasses that can record 10 seconds of video at a time and sync wirelessly with the mobile Snapchat app.


More than 55 million people use Snapchat daily in Europe for at least 30 minutes a day, according to Snap. It's unclear what sales number the company is targeting on the continent, given that the launch of the Spectacles in the U.S. didn't raise significant revenue, but today's rollout comes as part of a planned substantial investment in the product's marketing and distribution.

The camera-equipped sunglasses cost £130/150 euros and can be purchased from the product website or through "Snapbot" vending machines, which will appear on Friday in London, Paris, Barcelona, Berlin, and Venice. The vending machines dispense the Spectacles in either Black, Coral or Teal, and allow customers to try them on virtually using a built-in augmented reality display. A case and charging cable are included.


Discuss this article in our forums

Snapchat Spectacles Now Available to Purchase Online for $130

After debuting exclusively inside special pop-up vending machines last year, Snapchat has today begun selling its video-recording Spectacles online for $129.99. Like in the vending machines, the Spectacles come in Coral, Black and Teal, and include a charging case and cable. At the time of writing, shipping estimates sit at a delivery time within the next 2-4 weeks.


Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel said that the response to the Spectacles has been positive ever since the vending machines began appearing in California and New York. But, as TechCrunch uncovered in Snap's IPO filing, the company mentioned that "the launch of Spectacles . . . has not generated significant revenue for us." The filing further stated: "We expect to experience production and operating costs related to Spectacles that will exceed the related revenue in the near future."
“As Evan shared in his interview with the WSJ, when we launched, the idea was : ‘We’re going to take a slow approach to rolling them out,’ says Spiegel. ‘It’s about us figuring out if it fits into people’s lives and seeing how they like it.’ Response has been positive since November’s launch so we’re now happy to be able to make Spectacles more readily available — especially for those in the US who have not been able to make it to a Snapbot.”
When synced with the Snapchat mobile app, users can tap a button on Spectacles to begin recording a ten-second video, which is saved in the "Memories" section of the app and can be revisited and posted to their Story. Even though distribution has been added online, Snapchat said that customers can still expect the vending machines to appear at random new locations in the future, after they have a "brief nap."


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These smart glasses for cyclists will make you feel like a fighter jet pilot

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The augmented reality space may still be in its relative infancy, but AR smartphone apps like Pokémon Go and Snapchat are quickly taking the technology mainstream. 

And while smartphones seem like the natural fit for AR now, some are hoping for something less smartphone-specific that you can wear on your face (think a smaller, less bulky HoloLens style device). 

On Wednesday, Everysight announced the development of the Raptor smart glasses, a device designed for cyclists that puts real-time data such as speed, distance, time, heart rate (when connected to a separate heart rate monitor) and even turn-by-turn navigation on a clear visor directly in the rider’s line of sight.  Read more…

More about Wearable Tech, Wearables, Bicycles, Cycling, and Augmented Reality

Apple Watch Drops to Just 5% Share of Wearables Market as Basic Fitness Trackers ‘Reign Supreme’

While the Apple Watch remains the world's best selling smartwatch, the latest data from market research firm IDC reveals basic wearables "reign supreme" as consumers gravitate towards simple, dedicated fitness devices—which also typically cost less than the Apple Watch and other smartwatches.

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Shipments in millions (Source: IDC)

Basic wearables accounted for 85% of the market and experienced double-digit growth in the third quarter, according to IDC. Fitbit remained the leader with 23% market share, up from 21.4% a year ago, on the strength of its new Charge 2 fitness tracker. Fitbit shipped an estimated 5.3 million wearables in the quarter.

Xiaomi trailed in second as its $14.99 Mi Band is priced well below any competing wearables, allowing the Chinese company to capture 16.5% market share based on an estimated 3.8 million shipments in the quarter. Xiaomi's market share remained virtually unchanged from 16.4% a year ago.

Meanwhile, the Apple Watch captured just a 4.9% share of the broader wearables market in the quarter based on an estimated 1.1 million shipments, according to IDC. Comparatively, in the year-ago quarter, Apple had an estimated 3.9 million Apple Watch shipments for a much higher 17.5% market share.
"It's still early days, but we're already seeing a notable shift in the market," said Jitesh Ubrani senior research analyst for IDC Mobile Device Trackers. "Where smartwatches were once expected to take the lead, basic wearables now reign supreme. Simplicity is a driving factor and this is well reflected in the top vendor list as four out of five offer a simple, dedicated fitness device. Meanwhile, from a design perspective, many devices are focusing on fashion first while allowing the technology to blend in with the background."
IDC attributed Apple's decline in the third quarter to an "aging lineup" and an "unintuitive user interface." Apple addressed those concerns with Apple Watch Series 2, but the second-generation models launched in mid-September and therefore did not have a full impact on the third quarter.

Apple does not officially disclose Apple Watch sales, instead grouping the device under its "Other Products" category in earnings results.

Related Roundups: Apple Watch Series 2, watchOS 3
Tags: wearables, IDC, Fitbit
Buyer's Guide: Apple Watch (Neutral)

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Hey Snapchat, just sell Spectacles normally already, will ya?

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What started out as a fun, entertaining way to get people hyped about Spectacles is now just frustratingly annoying.

That’s right, I’m talking about how Snapchat Snap is still milking Spectacles out with its extremely limited release using Snapbot vending machines. 

It’s been three weeks already. Either sell me the damn camera glasses without me needing to stalk your website or I’m throwing my money on other more useful gadgets, like a pair of Beats Solo 3 wireless headphones for my headphone jack-less iPhone 7.

Look, I always give credit where credit is due. And Snapchat certainly deserves a great amount of credit for its guerrilla campaign for Spectacles. Read more…

More about Snap, Spectacles, Snapchat, Cameras, and Wearables

What it’s like to wear Nike’s HyperAdapt self-lacing sneakers

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Even the most tech-averse will admit that they’d like to step, even if just briefly, into a shoe from the future. That’s what Nike is promising with its self-lacing sneakers that have leapt from Hollywood screens into reality.

Nike put the dream of self-lacing shoes into the minds of sci-fi and sneaker fans when Michael J. Fox donned a fictional pair in 1989’s Back to the Future Part II. By 2015, the year the movie is set, Nike had seemingly perfected the technology in real life, first announcing the Nike Air Mags, replicas of the sneakers Fox wears in the movie, and later the HyperAdapt — a self-lacing sneaker Nike intends to sell as an actual product. Read more…

More about Wearables, Fashion, Nike Hyperadapt, Hyperadapt, and Wearable Tech