Xcode 9.3 Beta Includes New Tools to Help Developers Detect Apps Using Too Much Battery

Along with the first beta of iOS 11.3, Apple today also seeded the first beta of a new Xcode 9.3 update to developers. Xcode 9.3 introduces a new Energy organizer that's designed to help developers detect when an app or app extension is using up too much battery life on a user's device.

The Energy organizer will display logs that are generated when an app exceeds a "reasonable CPU threshold" when running in either the foreground or the background, making it easier for developers to pinpoint and fix bugs.

Xcode 9.3's release notes also mention a new 64-bit testing mode in macOS 10.13.4 that will allow developers to test software for 64-bit compatibility as Apple prepares to begin phasing out 32-bit Mac apps. In macOS 10.13.4, end users will see a notification when launching a 32-bit app, which warns them that 32-bit apps will not "run without compromise" in future versions of macOS.

Additionally, 32-bit is not offered as an option in Xcode's build settings UI, and the build system will emit a warning when building for macOS for the 32-bit architecture.

Xcode has also been designed to run more Swift build tasks in parallel with other commands, improving build times for Swift projects. It may, however, also result in increased memory usage during the build.

Xcode 9.3 requires a Mac running macOS 10.13.2 or later, which means the software will no longer run on Macs that continue to use older operating systems like Sierra.

Developers can download Xcode 9.3 from the Developer Center.

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Apple Releases Xcode 9 With Swift 4 and iOS 11, watchOS 4, tvOS 11, and macOS High Sierra SDKs

Alongside the new iOS 11, watchOS 4, and tvOS 11 updates, Apple has released Xcode 9, the latest version of the Xcode Mac app that lets developers create apps for Mac, iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, and Apple TV.

Xcode 9 introduces Swift 4 and all of the SDKs necessary to develop apps for iOS 11, watchOS 4, tvOS 11, and macOS High Sierra, including the new Core ML framework for machine learning and ARKit for augmented reality.

Xcode 9 includes a new structure-based editor with native Markdown support and faster navigation through code, plus it includes built-in refactoring that works across Swift, Objective-C, C, C++, Interface Builder, and more.

Faster search and wireless debugging for iOS and tvOS devices have been added, as have new debuggers for Metal. iOS playground templates now work in both Xcode and Swift Playgrounds, and Xcode server is built in, so there's no need to install macOS server.

There's a new source control navigator with integrated support for GitHub for better collaborative code management, and Simulator has been updated to behave more like a real device. It's also able to simulate multiple devices at once.

A full and extensive list of everything new in Xcode 9 is available from Apple's developer site, and an overview is also available on Apple's Xcode site. Many developers will already be familiar with the changes introduced as Xcode 9 has been in testing alongside iOS 11 and the other software updates since June.

Xcode can be downloaded from the Mac App Store for free. [Direct Link]

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